Wilkinson County, Ga.
News Articles 1860s
1860

January 3, 1860
Southern Recorder
Executor's Sale. Agreeably to the last will and testament of David Holliman, deceased, will be sold before the Court House door, in the town of Irwinton, Wilkinson county, on the first Tuesday in January next, the following property, to wit: one negro woman, Matilda, about 30 years of age; Scott, a boy, about 12 years old; Jerry, a  boy about ten years old; Jim, a boy about 8 years old. Sold for the benefit of the heirs and creditors of said deceased. Terms on the day of sale. T. J. Holliman, Executor. Nov 19, 1859.

January 3, 1860
Federal Union
MARRIED, On the evening of the 27th ult., by the Rev. Wiley F. Rogers, Mr. JAMES A. MASON, to Miss MELISSA M. BRANAN, of Wilkinson County.

January 10, 1860
Federal Union
Sixty days after date applicatin will be made to the ordinary of Wilkinson County, for leave to sell fifty (50) acres of land, lying in said county, and Easter and her child, negroes, belonging to the estate of Major C. Collins, late of said security, deceased. W. W. COLLINS, Adm'r. cum testamento annexo. November 17th, 1859.

January 10, 1860
The Weekly Georgia Telegraph
~excerpt. "Our January elections resulted in the choice of a mixed board, growing out of a straight out hand to hand fight on State Aid and Anti-State Aid-the former succeeded. Judge Bower, who wherever he is known, was esteemed as perhaps the best Ordinary in the State, declined a re-election, and Judge Harvill, a highly intelligent and estimable citizen, was chosen to succeed him. Judge Bower will continue the practice of the Law as heretofore. Mr. Tarpley, the present efficient Clerk, was re-elected, as he deserved to be. The late Sheriff, Mr. William O'Bannon, :the first man in the county," as the Irish say, retires from all connexion with the office, and is succeeded by Mr. Fleetwood, and Mr. Pittman as Deputy. Mr. O'Bannan, in many respects, is a good officer, but from kindness of heart was always against the State and for the prisoner. It has been said that Mr. O'B. believed it to be unconstitutional to arrest a woman with a criminal warrant, and as the fair sex figure on the "wrong side" of the docket in many cases in our Court, he has required either his Deputy or the Constabulary force of the District to encounter the wrath of woman. I think I should resort to some such device myself, were I in "authority."
   Irwinton is improving rapidly; several new residences are going up, and the Grand Jury have recommended the Town Commons to be sold, which will afford beautiful sites for others who may desire to come among us. Our population is moral, intelligent and enterprising. We have a daily mail, excellent schools, and enjoy church privileges. The location elevated and healthy, the water pure, and there is no reason why it should not increase in all the elements of social and commercial prosperity."

March 24, 1860
Weekly Georgia Telegraph
Stop the Scoundrel.    On the 9th instant, a man calling himself TOBE MURPHY, swapped a horse to me as his property which he had borrowed of the widow Radford, of Twiggs county, and has decamped leaving me without a consideration for the horse he has taken. He was seen in Macon last Saturday evening. He is a tall, spare man with black hair and whiskers, large dark eyes, which protrude a good deal. Any information of this scoundrel will be thankfully received by GEORGE W. WRIGHT, Toomsboro, Wilkinson Co., Ga. mar 34 d-2T w-1t

June 8, 1860
Macon Daily Telegraph
HORSE STOLEN
Stolen, from my plantation, in Wilkinson county, at No. 15, Central Rail Road, on the night of the 6th June, one of my Carriage Horses, a large bay, about 6 or 7 years old, in fair condition, trots well under the saddle, and in double harness. No particular marks recollected. He is supposed to  have been stolen by a Runaway Negro, who was arrested and escaped during the night; but may have been taken by a white man. A liberal reward will be paid for the recovery of the horse. J.H.R. Washington

June 19, 1860
Federal Union
   ~excerpt~ Departed this life on Tuesday 12th, inst., after a severe illness of eleven days of Diarrhoea, at the residence of Caswell Branan in Wilkinson County, Mr. George Herndon, in the 78 year of his age; he was a member of the Primitive Baptist Church at Myrtle Spring, for the last 45 years, and was a faithful member. The county by his loss has lost a good Citizen-the church a faithful member. He leaves to mourn his loss an affectionate wife and three children, with a large circle of friends and relatives, as there was none who knew him, but what like him.

August 21, 1860
Southern Recorder
~excerpt. DIED, Departed this life, on the 31 st ult., in Wilkinson county, Ga., MRS. NANCY SALTER, 64 years of age.

September 13, 1860
Macon Weekly Telegraph
~extract
Died, at the residence of Mr. Story, in Twiggs county, on the 8th inst., Dr. Anderson King, son of Wesley King, about 22 years.

September 13, 1860
Macon Weekly Telegraph
    With deep regret we announce the death of Mr. Wm. McNair, at his residence, in Wilkinson county, on Wednesday morning, the 29th ult.
  Mr. McNair died at the advanced age of fifty-eight, be was a gentleman of unsullied reputation, benevolent in disposition, liberal in his charities. His venerated remains was accompanied on Thursday evening to the Concord Church burial ground by an immense number of his friends and neighbors, who knew him long and loved him well.

September 18, 1860
Federal Union
~excerpt~Administratrix's Sale. ..1st Tuesday in November..Wilkinson... (90) Acres of Land, in the 27th District of said County, being parts of Lots No. 213, of said District; and No. 4 in the Fourth (4) District, adjoining lands of B. W. Finney, W. M. Whitehurst, and others, And (63) Sixty three Acres, more or less, of No 17, in the (4) District of said County, known as the Barbee Place, adjoining the lands of John McArthur, and others, all belonging to the Estate of Bardin Aycock, later of said County, deceased...ELLENDER AYCOCK, Admr'x. September 13th, 1860.

~excerpt~....Wilkinson Sheriff's Sale...first Tuesday in October next, ...One negro girl by the name of Angeline, about 17 years old;..property of F. P. Crutchfield..fi fas in favor of R. S. Smith ...Justice's Court of the 328th district, G. M..

  same time and place 50 acres of land, whereon W. H. Daniel now lives; levied on as the property of John L. Kinney...fi fas..Asher Ayers, and W. C. Parker; levied on and returned to me by R. Snow, constable..L. FLEETWOOD, Sheriff. August 28, 1860

  ~excerpt~will be sold on the first Tuesday in October next,..60 acres of lot of land No. 218, in the 26th district of Wilkinson county,..estate of Wm. J. Smith, late of said county, deceased. M. J. THOMPSON, Adm'r. de bonis non. Aug. 16, 1860
 

November 15, 1860
Augusta Chronicle and Sentinel
Fire In Irwinton, Ga. - A subscriber at Irwinton, Wilkinson county, Ga., in a letter to this office dated November 12, gives us the following intelligence: " Our citizens, Sunday morning, at half past 1 o'clock, were suddenly aroused by the cry of fire and ringing of the church bell-when the kitchen and outhouses at Bush's Hotel were discovered to be on fire, and were entirely destroyed, with the contents of the dairy. The __ were few, and the loss considerable. It was with great difficulty the the Hotel was kept from burning, the wind being high."

November 27, 1860
Federal Union
MARRIED, On the 15th inst., by C. O. Davis, Esq. at the residence of the bride's father, in Wilkinson county, Mr. VINSON S. JEANES, to Miss LURANY C. GOLDEN.

December 23, 1860
Augusta Chronicle and Sentinel
7,477 ACRES LAND FOR SALE
The undersigned offers the following LANDS in the 5th district of Dooly county, Nos. 515, 227, 199; in the 7th district Irwin county, Nos. 60, 115, 59, 172(?), 21, 72, 16, 118, 84, 19, 11, 152, 173; in the 3rd district Early county, No. 151; in the 17th district Early county, No. 141.
  I am anxious to sell the above Lands, and any one wishing to buy, will do well to call on, or address me, at Cool Spring, Wilkinson county, Ga.
N. J. Brown



1861
January 1, 1861
Federal Union
MARRIED. On the 27th ult., at the residence of the bride's father, in Wilkinson county, by C. O. Davis, Esq., Mr. THOMAS D. ETHEREDGE to Miss ELIZABETH CRISWELL.

February 2,1861
The New York Times
A Georgia paper states that the town of Gordon, situated on the Central Railroad at the junction of the road to Milledgeville, has, by an ordinance duly drawn up, signed, and adopted by a meeting of the citizens of the place, formally seceded from Wilkinson county, State of Georgia. The narrator proposes to call it the independent City of Gordon.

April 24,1861
Macon Telegraph
The 20th In Wilkinson County
Mr. Clisby: As you have received and published communications from nearly every part of the State, except this, I propose to give you and your readers and item or two concerning the "doings" in old Wilkinson. Today scenes have been enacted, which will long be impressed upon the minds of our citizens:
  At 10 o'clock this morning the "Wilkson Rifles," with officers Capt. Wm. O Bell, 1st Lieut. D. M. Clay, 2nd Lieut. S. A . Washington, Ensign J. Rivers.
    Numbering about 60 men, were formed on the parade ground, in Irwington: From whence, after drilling well for some time, they were marched to the Church, to hear a sermon by the Rev. Mr. Cooper, of Screven Co., who ably and feelingly fulfilled his task, after which the Corps was dismissed.
  At 1½ o'clock it was reformed, and by request of the citizens, marched into the Court House, where a public meeting had been called. The meeting having been organized, Messrs. Cochrane and Carswell offered and eloquently supported resolutions, which were passed providing for the appointment of a Committee to receive subscriptions to a fund, for the relief of the families of members as might be in need during the absence of the Corps, and to furnish to each member side arms. The Company was then marched out, and accompanied by a large number of the best citizens of the County, proceeded to the parade-ground, where, in the presence of the gentler sex, it was formed into a line.
  Miss Beall being assisted to the "stand,:" in a voice tremulous but rendered firm and musical by the patriotism which inspired her, addressed the Corps in terms chaste as beautiful and beautiful as patriotic. And in concluding, she, in behalf of the Ladies of Irwinton, presented to the Company an elegant Flag, which was received with an eloquent address by Dr. Fisher. The Flag is of the richest silk make, as Confederate States Flag, except that it has eight stars encircling the "Coat of Arms" of Georgia in gold, and in letters of the same, on one side of the white bar, it has inscribed-"Wilkinson Rifles." and on the other side the motto - Omnia Deoet Patria Dedicamur."
  After the presentation the Company resumed its drill, at the close of which, it being expected that as the "Rifles" stood about "head" on the list filling the three thousand requisition, they would have to "leave for the Wars" in a few days. Messrs. Cumming, Bower, Thompson and others, in addressing "the boys" gave them many eloquent words and assurances of an encouraging nature. Thus ended the day, and it has convinced many that the "Wilkinson Rifles," whether on the parade or in the house of the Lord, know how to demean themselves honorably, and that on the field of battle they will do it. Yours, Rusticas.

April 28, 1861
Augusta Chronicle and Sentinel
WILKINSON RIFLES
This corps are noted for "muscle," and can do their share in effective service, whether it be in throwing up breastworks, digging trenches, or in face-to-face encounter with the enemy. They received orders to march on Thursday at half- past 8 a.m., and by Friday at half-past 11 a.m., they were on their way hither, in good fighting order. They are made up from the yeomenry of Wilkinson county, and twenty of the men are over six feet high. Their uniform is Georgia Kersey, buff-colored.
OFFICERS
Captain - Wm. O. Beall;
1st Lieutenant D.M. Clay,
2nd Lieutenant S. H. Washington;
Ensign - Jonathan Rivers
Surgeon - Dr. Harris Fisher;
Orderly Sergeant - M. E. Boatright; 2nd "  Edward N. Clay
3d " A. Beall
4th " Benj. F. Pittman
5th " Robt. G. Hyman
1st Corporal - M.A. Hall
2d Jas. Pittman
3d O.M. Davis
4th Jas. L. Brannan
PRIVATES
J. W. Adkins; J.S. Adkins; Wm. H. Beals; John F. Brannan; Geo. Brown; J D F Brown; Jas. L  Brewer; J Bush; Elijah Butler; Joel Burke
W  F  Cannon; B F Cannon; F J Carroll; A H Cumming; E H Davis, T M Davis; W H Dean; L F Etheridge; L M Etheridge; N J Etheridge; F F Golden; W I Golden; H M Green; B T Gilbert; A P Gilbert;
T F Holder; J J Howard; A C Hooks; Levy Horton; E F Hughs; T J Houston; Leroy Jordan; T J Jordan; Richd Lewis; Jas H Lord;
Thos J Meadows; F M Meadows; T A McKeesie; John E McNeal; A J McGraw; John Meredith; Joseph Nesbit
L L Peacock; Jas ? Pennington; Joel Pierce; Sam P Player; John H Phillips; Chas F Porter; Ralph E Rosenburg; Wm T Ryle
Jasper J L Smith; J H Sheppard; R H Spence; Rollin A Stanley; Wesley Stevens; Edward A Tarpley; J N Valandingham
Lewis Wood; G B Wood; J H Waters; W P Williams; Wm Usery; John Vaughn

April 30, 1861
Southern Recorder
For the Southern Recorder
MESSRS EDITORS: - On a visit to Irwinton, I had the pleasure of seeing the "Wilkinson Rifles" leave for Virginia. A fine and noble looking company, composed of just such men as can stand hardships, numbering about eighty. Their uniforms, plan, neat and substantial. Thursday the 25th inst., they all met at the Court House to receive marching orders from their gallant Commander, Capt. Wm. O. Beall. Several speeches were made, and assistance given, in what was more substantial-money for their benefit; over one thousand dollars were raised. The Capt. stated that he had Bibles from Dr. Thompson to distribute among them. Rev. Mr. Hughes was called on to offer prayer in their behalf, as it was perhaps the best time they would all meet in their company room with their friends. An earnest, fervent and devoted prayer it was.
  Orders were given for every man to meet at Station No. 16, C.R.R., on the next day at 10 o'clock, A.M. Three heavy cheers were given for the friends that assisted them.
  On Friday the crowd collected early at the Station; there were at least one thousand persons present, from old men and women, down to little children. The company was former near the Ware house, and an address made to them by Miss Thompson. I did not have the pleasure of hearing it, but learned it was very good and appropriate. They were then dismissed to bid farewell to their friends; and a sad farewell it was; if there was a dry eye, I did not see it. He who could not shed a tear, must have had a heart of stone. Fathers, mothers, wives and sisters clinging to their beloved ones, young ladies presenting their lovers with bouquets, which they hung in the muzzles of their rifles, thereby indicating their intention to cherish and protect those gentle confiding ones even at the point of the bayonet. Near the time the train was expected, they were again assembled and had a short exhortation and Prayer from Dr. Thompson, committing them to the care of our Heavenly Father, who rules all things for our good.
  At half past eleven the cars arrived with companies from Eatonton, Twiggs and the Baldwin Blues from your city, with one general huzza for old Wilkinson. We there had a scene which beggars description: a combination of joy and tears-all in good spirits however, with the will and strength to do good service in the cause of our country's freedom. Lincoln's armies may walk over their dead bodies, but conquer their brave spirits never, never.
   A hearty God speed to you, gallant young soldiers our sympathies and prayers go with you; Should you return worn down by fatigue, and perhaps disease, there are others to fill your places for "our country and our rights: is our motto forever. VISITOR.

July 4, 1861
Macon Daily Telegraph
~extract
Master Roll of the Ramah Volunteer Guards, Wilkinson County
OFFICERS
Captain - Robert W. Folsom
1st Lieut. Chas. C. Kelly
2nd ". W.J. Solomon
3rd " John T. Lingo
1st Sergeant John McArthur
2nd " Wm. N. Ryle
3rd " M. A. Whitaker
4th " N. Shelverton
5th " C. N. Solomon
1st Corporal - L. Lavender
2nd " Henry Goodman
3rd " Adam J. Ryle
4th " Samuel Gee
Surgeon - R. G. Solomon
PRIVATES
Jasper Aycock; Wm J Bush; Benj H Bush; J R Bostick; Green Barbee; John Bacherlor; Leonard Barnett
Joel Brewer
E L Bass
R I Carr; George Christian; J H Cranford;Jackson Cone; R I Croom; Shadrach Croom
Chas Dennard; A C Dennard; Wm H Dixon; Romulus Dixon; Henry Dykes; M P Dykes
B W Finney; J J Galloway; Jas M Helton; West Haywood; S J Hathorn; H A Jessup; W B Jones
J C Kennington; Briton Kennington; Danl Kennington; Joyn G King; J R Kelley; J E Kent
Hamp Lyles; Wm Langford; Sol McConnell; Daniel Myers; Seaborn Myers; Jas R Myrick; J F Nelson
J C Parker; Henry Price; Joseph Ramage; S P Raines; Wesley Raines; Jas Rogers; Robert Runnels; Danl J Ryle
Wm Smallwood; Elijah Smallwood; Thomas Smallwood; M M Sanders; Wm J Sanders; Govey Sanders; Jas Sanders
Wm Sharp; D M Sharp; Thos Sharp; Wiley J Smith; W J Savage; J M Sheffield; Larkin T Smith; John F Valentine; Green Vincent; Wm Wheeler; David Welch; Daniel Wood; Joseph Wood; John F Valentine; Green Vincent; Wm Wheeler
Drummer - J. J. Dykes
3 Servants. 36 men six feet high and upwards; average age of the members, twenty-four years.

August 15, 1861
The Macon Daily Telegraph
Look Out For Him
Dr. A. Blaisdell, a Yankee Dentist, who, for several months past had been suspicioned as an abolitionist, and sent to the South, was apprehended by the Carswell Guards, for uttering disrespectful language at the public speaking during their encampment, and after a decent ride upon a large pine rail, was drummed out of the camp, and ordered to leave the Southern Confederacy.
 the said Dr. A. Blaisdell left Wilkinson county, Georgia, on the 3d of August, with his wife and one child, and if he is still lurking in any of the Confederate States, he may be recognized by the following description: He is very tall, large and bony, being over 6 feet high, with large square shoulders, long nose, large mouth, angular features, blue or light gray eyes, auburn hair, tolerably thin beard, and a quick and pleasant address.
Citizens of Wilkinson.

August 20, 1861
Federal Union
  Died  on Monday, 5th inst., of Typhoid Fever after many days sickness at the Naval Hospital, Portsmouth, Virginia. Mr. H. MARSHALL GREEN, in the 26th year of his age.
  The deceased leaves a kind and affectionate wife, father and mother, and a large circle of relatives and friends to mourn his early death., His home was in Wilkinson county, Georgia, where his body was sent for interment.
  In his death his county sustains the loss of a useful and worthy citizen.
   Early in the spring, when the present troubles were gathering thickly in the Southern Confederacy he joined the purpose of talking part in the struggle, and at the time of his death was still a member of that Company, in Third Regiment Georgia Volunteers, stationed at Camp Gywnn, Va.
   In his death our Company sustains the loss of one of its most efficient members. Ever ready and willing to perform the duties devolving upon him as a good citizen at home, the kindred qualities that characterized and prompted him there were not lost in the life of the social friend and faithful soldier in the camp. F. E. G. Private W. Rifles.  Camp Gwynn, Va., Aug. 8, '61.

August 29, 1861
Augusta Chronicle and Sentinel
From our Evening Edition of yesterday. Movements of Troops - The Carswell Guards, Capt. N. A. Carswell, a fine company of able bodied young men from Wilkinson county, arrived here by special train last night, and went forward this morning. They number 104 rank and file.

September 24, 1861
Southern Recorder
DIED In Wilkinson county, on 18th inst. Mrs. SARAH L. aged 57 years, relict of the late Samuel Bragg.

October 14, 1861
Macon Telegraph
~extract~  re Fall Term of Superior Court.  Irwinton, Oct. 10th, 1861
  These sentiments met with a hearty response from the patriotic people of Wilkinson, a county that I venture to say is behind none in Georgia, in liberal contributions of men and money to the war.
We have sent six companies - Capt. Beall's, Capt. Carswell's, Capt. (now Lt. Col.) Folsom's, Capt. Shinholser's, Capt. Hall's and Capt. Story's. Several of our citizens have been most generous in their donations. Mr. Wm. E. Carswell, Col. John Smith, Mr. Joel Butler, and David Solomon, Thomas N. Beall, and Alexander Baum, are specially to be mentioned for large contributions. The women, however, are deserving the highest praise. They have worked assiduously from the beginning, in making garments and furnishing hospital stores, and two bright-eyed girls, whom I met to-day, returning from the point of departure of two companies, said to me that they intended to raise a company and got themselves. God bless the women, should be, and doubtless is, the prayer of every soldier in the Confederate Army.
  Robert Foster was sent to the Penitentiary for two years - charge larceny, and plea of guilty. Crops of corn, peas and potatoes abundant - cotton moderate. Bacon very  scare, but oceans of beef. RAMAH.

October 15. 1861
Southern Recorder
MARRIED, At the residence of Mr. James G. Shinholser in Wilkinson Co., Geo., on the 9th inst., by the Rev. Dr. Talmadge, Mr.
R. B. WADDELL of Columbia S. C. to Miss HARRIET E. SHINHOLSER.

October 22, 1861
Southern Recorder
  Departed this life, October 15th, 1861, at her home in Wilkinson county, Mrs. LAMENTINE JONES. She was a member of the Baptist Church, and died in full triumph of faith. She left many friends to weep over her; but our loss is her eternal gain.

October 29, 1861
Southern Recorder
SUSAN, wife of William Wynne, and daughter of William and Martha Hinson, late of Burke co., Ga., died in Wilkinson co., Ga., on 11th August, aged 65 years and 8 months.
  Mrs. Wynne was married to her husband 2d day of May 1811; has had twenty children; has been a steady member of the M. E. Church thirty-three years. Her home was made happy by a confiding and Christian husband and dutiful children. The house of Mr. and Mrs. Wynne has been the preachers' home in Wilkinson county. It was her pride and pleasure to make welcome and meet the traveling preacher as a mother. Truly she was a mother in Israel who showed her faith by her works was faith made perfect. She is gone to the happy world, and leaves a disconsolate husband and eleven children, and forty-five grand-children to mourn their loss.
  MissFRANCES WYNNE, daughter of William and Susan Wynne, died in Wilkinson co., July 17th, 1861, aged 43 years and 3 months.
  She was a member of the M.E. Church twenty-five years. Her walk amply demonstrated to her friends, that the cause of her Lord and Master was uppermost in her mind. In her last days she gave evidence of her acceptance in her Saviour's house not made with hands eternal in the Heavens.
  MRS. BENETER DAVIS,  daughter of William and Susan Wynne, and widow of Elbert Davis, dec'd, died in Wilkinson county, aged 32 years, 4 months and 12 days, leaving five children to mourn the loss of an industrious and affection mother.
  She was also a member of the M. E. Church, and her acts and walks as a Christian, fairly demonstrate to her friends and neighbors, that she was endeavoring to make her calling and election sure. A FRIEND.

November 30, 1861
Daily Federal Union
Administrator's Sale. Will be sold before the Court House in Wilkinson county, Geo., on the first Tuesday in January next, in the usual sale hours the undivided land of the Estate ofSamuel Bragg deceased, being 435 acres, known as being the Dower of Sarah Bragg, there is a good dwelling house and all other necessary buildings, gin-house and screw on said parcel of land, it all being in a body and well watered. Sold for a division of said Estate.
  Also, at the same time and place, all the Negroes belonging to the Estate of Sarah Bragg, late of said county deceased, to-wit: Jube a man 60 years of age, Calvin 24 years of age, Jon a boy 17 years of age, Andrew 7 years of age, Sally a woman about 50 years of age. Kitty 22 years of age and her child 18 months, Mariah 10 years of age. Said Negroes sold for the benefit of the heirs and creditors of said Estate. Terms made known on the day of sale. JOHN K. BRAGG, Adm'r. SARAH BRAGG, Adm'rx de bonis non. November 21st 1861.

December 7, 1861
Augusta Chronicle and Sentinel
Singular Occurrences- We learn, that while a widow woman named Smith, who resides in Wilkinson County, two and one half miles from Gordon, was employed in her yard, last week, surrounded by her children, one of them a little girl, named Louisa, about three years of age, suddenly disappeared. In less than 10 or 15 minutes she was missed and immediate search was made for her but without success. The wells or every other place where the child could have fallen or been concealed, have been thoroughly searched, without finding any trace of her. For three or four days the neighbors in the vicinity have used every exertion to ascertain her whereabouts, but up to the present time nothing has been seen or heard of the little one. Her mother and other relatives are deeply distress in consequence of the mysterious disappearance of a favorite child.  Sav. Rep.

(Note: 1860 Census list Louisa Smith, age 25, head of household, in Ramah District, youngest child was Queen E. Smith, age 2 who does not appear in 1870 census.)



1862

January 5, 1862
Macon Daily Telegraph
DIED. Maj. J. R. Cochran, of Dublin, Ga., died at Irwinton at half past 10 o'clock, P.M., of Gastro Enteretie. He was on his way to his Regiment stationed at Savannah when taken down. He commenced sinking fast from 10 in the morning, previous to which his physicians had no apprehensions of his death. He held an enviable position at the Bar, was held in high esteem as a gentleman in private life, and was thought fit to be put in command as Major in 2d Regiment, Harrison's Bridgade, in defence of his bleeding country. Peace to his ashes.  Jan. 4, 1862.

February 14, 1862
Macon Weekly Telegraph
MARRIED. In Irwinton, on the 12th inst., by Rev. J. W. Burke, Rev. J. T. Ainsworth to MissLucinda C. McRaney, of the former place.

April 2, 1862
Macon Daily Telegraph
LADIES GUN BOAT FUND
 Contributions From Ladies of Irwinton and Vincinty. Irwinton, Ga., April 3d, 1862
Miss Ella Breazeal $5.00; Miss Maxa Beall 5.00; Mrs. M. J. Carswell 5.00; Mrs. H. Walker 2.00; Mrs. E S Coyle 5.00
Mrs R A Stanley 1.00; Mrs. M.T. Doyle 1.00; Mrs. M Cumming 5.00; Mrs. M Cates 1.00; Mrs M Eason 1.00; Miss M E Ladd 5.00
Miss Mary Louther 5.00; Mrs. M C Fisher 1.00; Mrs M E Boatright 3.00; Miss Anna Boatright 1.00; Miss Sallie Boatright 1.00
Mrs M Barrett 2.00; Mrs E P Beall 2.00; Mrs. B Renfroe 1.00; Mrs. T N. Beall 3.00; Miss Emma Beall 1.00; Miss Mary Beall 1.00
Mrs A Baum 5.00; Miss Annie Thompson 1.00; Miss Fannie Thompson 1.00; Mrs. M E Cumming 1.00; Mrs E Bush 1.00
Miss Lizzie Deese 1.00; Mrs. Fannie Clay 1.00; Mrs S Jordan 1.00; Miss Zilpha Peacock .25; Mrs E Gilbert 1.00;
Miss Mattie J Hughs 1.00; Miss Josie Hays 1.00; Mrs. Amelia Hicks 2.00; Mrs E Harville 1.00; Miss Martilla Harville 1.00;
Miss Epsey Harville 1.00; A Soldier's Wife 1.00; Mrs. S C. Hyman 2.00; Mrs M Bower 1.00; Mrs L Walden 2.00; Mrs M Hooks 1.00;
Miss Sallie Hooks 1.00; Mrs. Nettie Nisbet 1.00; Mrs Reena Tarpley .50

Note: The Gun Boat Fund was started in Savannah for the commission of a gun boat or an iron-clad floating battery  for the defence of the  Savannah harbor. Ladies from all of Georgia contributed to the fund.   The "floating battery with propellers", "The Georgia Ladies Ironclad Battery"  was ready for service in July 1862 and turned over to the Confederate Navy.
Source: Macon Daily Telegraph 4-25-1862 and 7-10-1862

May 1, 1862
Augusta Chronicle
Correspondence of the Macon Telegraph
Battle of South Mills. Col. A. H. Wright and The Third Georgia. Company Bivouac, South Mills, N.C. April 24th, 1862
    Our monotonous life was somewhat enlivened last Saturday by an engagement with the enemy, who, confident of the success which greatly superior numbers ought to secure, attempted to capture the hated 3d. As you will probably have seen before this reaches you, they did not quite succeed in carrying out their well-laid scheme, and the Bloody 3d (as they term it) is still able to do some service for Mr. Jeff Davis and the Southern Confederacy.
    Our regiment was stationed at intervals along the road from South Mills to Elizabeth City, a distance of fourteen miles, with only three companies at South Mills. On Friday night, we, the lower companies, received orders from Colonel Wright to return to South Mills to act in conjunction with the companies there, and a little after sunrise the next morning we started to that place, the Yankees commencing to shell the city as we left, throwing their shell with such precision that one of them passed through a house in which a company of cavalry were quartered, thereby hastening their departure. Learning that they intended coming up the Pasquotank river, which the road crosses eleven miles above the city, for the purpose of cutting off our return (not retreat) the order to "double quick" was given and the boys "struck a trot," which in the space of two hours carried them over the fourteen miles. Here let me say that arriving at our entrenchment eight miles from the city, we were drawn up in line and waited for the approach of the enemy, Captain McComas' artillery supporting our little battalion. The enemy not appearing, however, we resumed the march, having halted about thirty minutes, and arrived at our allotted position, about 10 o'clock A.M.
     Col. Wright having learned that the enemy had landed at Camden Court House, in force, and were marching towards South Mills, determined, although he had a greatly inferior numerical force, to give them battle. Choosing his position, he disposes his forces and stationed the artillery, three pieces, according to the advantage offered by the ground - the artillery commanding a straight lane, up which the Yankees were expected to advance. A narrow belt of woods skirted the fields on either side of the lane, running across and at right angles with it, and in this the advanced companies (three in number) were drawn up in line - the others being held in reserve on the other side of the woods in some fields. Finding that a large house about three hundred yards from the end of the lane would likely afford the enemy protection, it was burned to the ground, and a fence on the edge of a deep ditch, running parallel to our line was torn down, thrown into the ditch and on their approach set afire, to prevent their using the ditch as a cover against us.
    About 10 o'clock the enemy were seen advancing up the lane, apparently unconscious of the presence of a foe and they were allowed to march quietly until within about five eighths of a mile, when our artillery opened upon then dealing death and spreading confusion among them. They soon recovered, and bringing their artillery to the front, returned out fire, their shot and shell going wide of their mark , and flying over the tops of the pines, beneath which our men were stationed. Finding they were getting the worst of it with artillery, the 9th N.Y. Fire Zouaves were ordered to charge our battery, and foolishly enough, the regiment in four ranks advanced up the narrow lane to the charge, until within seventy five or eighty yards, when a round from the artillery and a well directed volley from the infantry cut a lane from one end of their line to the other, sending then back in confusion. The soon recovered, however, and advanced to the charge again and again, but each time with the same result. Instead of taking the battery, many of them too leave of the world. The other Yankee regiments, five, making six in all, had deployed soon after we fired the first gun, and were in line across the open fields, pouring volley after volley into the woods, but the wind being favorable to us, blew the smoke of our guns towards then, and this, with their bad shooting, rendered their fire useless and ineffectual. Time and again they attempted to drive us from our position, and letting then come up to within thirty to fifty years, we would by a well directed discharge, send them reeling back with heavy loss. Once an officer was seen advancing, sword in hand, on horseback, at the head of his column, cheering and urging his men on. On they came - on, nearer and nearer, until within half musket range, when some of our boys singled him out and took deliberate aim.    They fired and a black horse was seen riderless galloping from the spot. We have since learned that this was Gen. Reno. Col. Hawkins, our old Hatteras friend, and commander of the Zouaves, had his arm shot off, and several other officers, an Adjunct among them; who was buried on the field, attested the precision of our aim.
     About 3 o'clock P.M., Col. Wright finding that the enemy were attempting to flank us, ordered the men to fall back about a mile to an entrenchment, expecting the enemy would follow. Our company, the Wilkinson Rifles, and the Governor's Guards, were ordered to cover the retreat, which we did under a galling fire from the enemy's artillery. Having fallen back on the entrenchment we awaited the approach of the enemy, but hey had already had enough of it, and we having waited some time, laid down on the wet ground (the rain fell heavily during the night) and slept.
    Capt. McComas, of the Artillery, fought his men most gallantly and did terrible execution among the enemy. One wheel of a gun was shot off by the enemy, and in turning to order another to be brought up, he was shot through the breast with a Minnie ball, which instantly killed him. All honor to his name! which the 3rd Georgia will ever hold in grateful remembrance.
     During the regular engagement none of our men were killed, but as we began to fall back on our entrenchments, our regiment lost five. W. Milton Deese, of our company, (Rifles,) was killed by a ball through the head, while fighting gallantly. We lost four others, (five in all) killed, and about twenty wounded-none of them supposed to be mortally. Lieut. Wilson, of the Dawson Grays, was shot in the knee, and left on the field of battle, but was afterwards recovered. The Yankees acknowledge to have lost between 300 and 500 in killed and wounded, besides some 35 to 40 prisoners, against four prisoners on our side. They buried about forty on the battle field the night of the battle, and sent off the others on their boats. About midnight one of our men accidentally discharged his musket, which they heard, and supposing it to be the signal for the renewal of the fight, they fled precipitately, leaving their stolen fowls uncooked as an evidence of their haste.
     Now to sum up: In the main part of the engagement we had about 325 men, and at no time more than 500 were engaged on our side, not including Capt. McComas' 80 or 90 artillerist. In all, say 910, against an admitted number on their side of from three to five thousand, with artillery equal if not superior to ours
     Our entire loss is six killed and about twenty wounded, and four taken prisoners - making our total loss 30, against our estimate of 500 on their side total loss. We took prisoners from six different regiments, proving conclusively that that had between 5,000 and 6,000 men in the field against us, with whom we successfully contended seven hours, and then scared off the battle field, where a portion of their dead now lie buried.
    When you put this with the capture of the Fanny and the-Chicamaconmico race, I do not think our friends will feel ashamed of the Third Georgia. We, in all our fighting, have been in a country where running is fashionable, and we have done all we could to contribute to the fashion-the only difference between us and the people here-abouts being that we ran after and they run from the enemy.
    Tuesday morning we all went out the the battle field to see the effect of our fire on the enemy. The sun as shining beautifully, and the birds, were singing merrily amidst the shining apple blossoms in the orchard, where but a short time before, whizzing balls and bursting bombs were scattering death. Here and there is a dark crimson spot marked the place where some misguided breathed his life away; while now and then a small pile of brains showed where some poor wretch was hurried into eternity without time to say farewell to those around him. In one place eleven Zouaves lay buried side by side, with their names and company on "head-boards/" In another lay six or seven, and in another some graves had two tenants. None of them were buried more than a foot deep, owing to the haste and the swampy nature of the ground.
     The Yankees' artillery made sad, havoc with the tops of the pines, and their infantry galled them severely around the artillery position of Captain McComas.
    The field was strewn with various mementos of the battle, in the form of grape and canister shot, and fragments of shot, and the curious in such matters might have gathered any number of these "souvenirs of friendship."
     Returning from the battle field, we, at 5 o'clock P.M., proceeded to pay the last sad tribute to our failed comrades. The regiment formed in line with arms reversed, and as the ambulance moved its head, the band commenced playing, and we slowly marched to the village burial ground, where five graves, side by side, were ready for the gallant dead. I thought, as we slowly defiled through the almost deserted village, that it was hard for the poor fellows to be placed in the earth without a tear to wet their graves. Men are, at best, callous in their natures, and the army tends greatly to blunt our finer sensibilities, so I expected no display of emotion, but in this I was mistaken. Woman is the same the world ever keenly alive to the sufferings of others and even in this out of the way place there were those who kindly dropped a tear upon the soldier's grave and heaved  a sympathizing sigh for the sorrowers at home,. Our chaplain feelingly performed the usual ceremonies, and the whole regiment having been divided into three divisions, fired the customary salute. After which we were marched back to the parade and dismissed.
     The day after the battle reinforcements were sent down consisting of the 22d Ga., with eight companies of N.C. volunteers, so that we now have a force here of about 3000 infantry, one company of Artillery and two companies of cavalry  which General Blanchard commands in person, much to our regret - he is too slow.  Col. W., sent up before the battle for the 22d and 4th Ga, and he (the General) promised that he should be here by 10 A.M., Saturday. He failed to start them until that time Sunday, and if it had not been for the gallantry of Col. W, and his men, we would all probably be on our way to Fort Warren.  Fortunately, Gen. Loring came over from Suffolk today and informed us that if we had another fight, he would command us, and bring 4000 to our assistance from Sandy Cross, at which place he had left those with whole he had started to aid us.
    Col. Wright has just said he intended to leave for home in six days. He is the idol of both men and officers and could be unanimously reelected. Loring says there will be no more fighting here. I am broken own on the march ever since the fight, otherwise well.  S.

May 6, 1862
Southern Federal Union
RULE NISI.Faithy Honeycutt vs. Meredith Honeycutt
Libel for Divorce in Wilkinson Superior Court
  It appearing to the County by the return of the Sheriff, that the defendant is not to be found in the county of Wilkinson, it is ordered that service be perfected on said defendant by publication of this Rule in the Federal Union, a public Gazette in Milledgeville, once a month for three months before the next term of this Court.
  A true extract from the minutes of Wilkinson Superior Court, April Term, 1862. Geo. WE. Tarpley, Clerk May 1st, 1862.

May 6, 1862
Southern Federal Union
RULE NISI. M. E. Flemister vs. W. L. Flemister. Libel for Divorce in Wilkinson Superior Court
It appearing to the County by the return of the Sheriff, that the defendant is not to be found in the county of Wilkinson, it is ordered that service be perfected on said defendant by publication of this Rule in the Federal Union, a public Gazette in Milledgeville, once a month for three months before the next term of this Court.
  A true extract from the minutes of Wilkinson Superior Court, April Term, 1862. Geo. WE. Tarpley, Clerk May 1st, 1862.
 

May 23, 1862
Georgia Weekly Telegraph
Editor Telegraph: I enclose you the following touching letter from the Chaplain of the Third Georgia Regiment, to the parents of the deceased, William M. Deese, of the Wilkinson Rifles, the first company which left Wilkinson county for the war, who fell in the battle of the "glorious Third," at South Mills, on the 19th April. It encourages the living soldier, who braves everything for our defence, to know that if he shall fall in the conflict, he is not forgotten at home, but that his memory is cherished by those he has given his life to defend. The writer of this knew the deceased well, and nothing said in his praise in not more than true; and although but 18 or 19 years old, he responded to the first summons of his country, and had served his twelve months out. On the day of the battle, Mr. Deese, although a member of the Regimental Band and not required by duty to enter the fight, laid aside his bugle, took up a musket, and entered the ranks and fought gallantly for five hours in the most hotly contested conflict of this war, and fell in the last moments of the battle, pierced by a rifle ball through the head. His regiment returning to the battle-field the next morning, found his body, his pockets rifled, and most of his apparel abstracted. His comrades in arms secured his body and sent it home to his stricken parents where it was interred in Wilkinson county in the presence of over six hundred friends, who, weeping, are proud to point to the example of his valor, encouraging their brothers, husbands and sons who are yet spared from the sacrifice. C.
 

June 10, 1862
Macon Daily Telegraph
862 Gordon, Ga., June 8, 1862
Editor Telegraph: Please publish, if you wish to, the following extract of a letter received this day from one of my brothers, in Co. B., 14th Ga. Reg't:
RICHMOND, VA. , June 2, 1862
    Bro. Sol., as I just now heard from him, is well and safe. Our Regiment was in the fight last Saturday, the 31st of May, and suffered awful. We lost, in killed and wounded, about 100 men. Of our company (B) was killed, George Denard and Joel Brewer. Wounded, A. C. Denard, Joe Dykes, R. L. Grooms, but none serious. I was here sick. When I heard of the fight, I went to go to my company, but could not find it, so I went in the fight with the 6th Alabama Regiment, but did not get hurt, except on the leg with a piece of shell, but I am all right now. We are expecting a big fight to morrow.
Your bro.,
H. Goodman
1st Serg't Co. B, 14th Reg't Ga. Vols.
Capt. Kelly and his brother were not killed, as reported.

July 12, 1862
Macon Telegraph
~extract
From Report of Killed and Wounded in the 14th Ga. Reg't in the Battles before Richmond on the 26th, 27th and 30th of June, 1862.
Company B
H. Lyles, killed ;J Collins, killed; J F Valentine, severely wounded in side, shoulder and arm; Jos Ramage, mortally wounded
Q W Dykes, contusion; H A Dyles, contusion; Lt. W J Solomon, slightly wounded in head; Jno Young, contusion

July 18, 1862
Georgia Weekly Telegraph
Casualties, Battle of Malvern Hill , July 1
Wilkinson Rifles - Co. F
Killed: Privates: J M Brown; A P Gilbert; W L Golden; G E Schmidt
Wounded:
Serg't J Meredith, severely in arm and thigh
Privates: J W Adkins, slightly in cheek; F A Cannon, in arm; J T Dupree, in thigh; B J Dupree, seriously in body; C M Hearndon, in foot; T H Pennington, in foot and side; W T Ryle, in hand

Carswell Guards Co. I
Killed: Privates: W J Evans; H Meadows
Wounded:
Lieut J F Wynn, seriously in breast; Serg't A C Manson, in left arm; Corpl M A Fleetwood, one finger off left hand; T T Bell, seriously in the breast; D Cauley, seriously in breast; T Dixon, left thigh; J G Gates, slightly in groin; J Hooks, seriously in thigh and leg; A J L Kilter, seriously in thigh; J Keel, thumb; J G Ockington, slightly in head and leg; M Outlaw, slightly in head; A J Pierce, seriously in leg; E C Pierce, seriously in hip; L Smith, foot and arm; W J Sutton, seriously in thigh; R S Sutton, seriously in wrist; W J Wynn, seriously in the thigh; Missing: E Horton; P A Wynn

July 23, 1862
Macon Daily Telegraph
The Ramah Volunteer Guards - Fourteenth Georgia Regiment.
Camp 14th Georgia, Regiment, Near Richmond, Va., July 19, 1862.
Editor Telegraph. - Will you allow the writer a short space in the columns of your excellent journal, to say a word or two in relation to the different volunteer companies now in service from the county of Wilkinson. The readers of the Telegraph in this county of Wilkinson. The readers of the Telegraph in this county are well aware of the fact that several of these companies - Capt. Carswell's and Capt. Waters' of the Third Ga. Regiment Capt. Player's of the 49th, and Capt. Kelley's of the 14th participated in the recent desperate contest before the city of Richmond, and all, no doubt, won for themselves imperishable honors, and glory and fame. The good citizens of Wilkinson, knowing that these companies must, of necessity, have suffered greatly in the several contests, and with that magnanimity characteristic of the generous people of that county, appointed a committee to visit the different companies, ascertain their condition, look after their welfare, and as far as possible alleviate the wants of the suffering. This committee proceeded to Richmond, visited the different companies -except Capt. Kelley's company, from Ramah District. Your correspondent would like to know why this company was not thought of by the committee, as well as the others? The writer positively states, for the information of the citizens of said county, that the committee visited one of the companies- Capt. Player-which was only distant from Capt. Kelley's company about three hundred yards - and remained with it for two or three days - and did not condescend to visit the Ramah Volunteer Guards, enquire into its casualties, and actually returned home none the wiser in regard to its condition. The company participated in the fierce contest of the "Seven Pines," and also participated in all the recent engagements before Richmond, and suffered as much, (or more) as any of the above-named companies. The Guards were led into action by 1st. Lieut. W. J. Solomon, -Capt. Chas. C. Kelley being in command of the Regiment - and nobly did it sustain itself in the hour of need. No more gallant officers or men cannot be found in the service. The Regiment (the 14th) lost full one third of the men carried into action.
  As the friends of the Ramah Volunteer Guards will be anxious to know of the actions of the committee toward them, I have taken this method of informing them. Their (the committee) expenses were paid for by the county to visit all the companies, and now the citizens of Wilkinson can judge of the propriety and justice in sending out more committees, at the expense of the public "pap" to look after their brave volunteer who are nobly sacrificing everything to regain our freedom and independence. Very Respectfully, &c,
A. Private Of The Ramah Volunteer Guards.

August 5, 1862
Southern Federal Union.
Mrs. Elizabeth Freeman, wife of John Freeman, Sr., died at his residence in Wilkinson county, Ga., on the 25th of May, 1862, aged about 59 years. She was born in Lenoir county, N.C. and remained there until 1821, when she removed to Georgia, and in 1822 was married. When about 14 years of age she joined the M. E. Church, and lived a consistent and exemplary life until the day of her death, which was more than 41 years. For many years her house was always open for the reception of preachers, and she was ever ready and willing to show them favors, and  administer to their necessity and comfort. She was respected and much esteemed by her neighbors and acquaintances, and was looked upon and regarded as a Christian, a pattern worthy of imitation. Sister Freeman has left a kind husband, nine children, a number of grand children and acquaintances to mourn their irreparable loss. The Church has lost one of its brightest and best members We have every reason for believing that our loss is her eternal gain' that while we may be sighing and sorrowing here, she is in the celestial kingdom, inhaling heavenly atmosphere and joining in the sweet melodies of heaven. "Where the wicked cease from troubling and the weary are ever at rest"
  She was taken with a congestive chill and lingered under her painful illness, eight days, with christian fortitude, and without a murmur.  A FRIEND.

August 5, 1862
Macon Daily Telegraph
-Excerpt
   Whereas M. A. Thompson and Russel Thompson applies to me for Letters of Administration on the estate of W. M. Thompson, deceased, late of said county
29th July, 1862, Ellis Harvill, Ordinary

August 5, 1862
Macon Daily Telegraph
-Excerpt
Whereas Thomas W. Dupree applies to me for Letters of Guardianship of the person and property of Florence Stanley, minor of Rowel Stanley, deceased.
 this the 29th day of July, 1862. Ellis Harvill, Ord'y

August 5, 1862
Macon Daily Telegraph
-Excerpt
 Whereas M. J. Carswell, Guardian of the person and property of William B. Carswell, a minor of said county, having fully discharged his trust, applies to be dismissed from his Guardianship as aforesaid:
this 29th July, 1862. Ellis Harvill, Ordinary

August 5, 1862
Macon Daily Telegraph
-Excerpt
Whereas Winaford Shepherd, of said State and county applies to me for Letters of Administration on the estate of Joshua Shepherd, deceased, late of said county and State:
this the 29th of July, 1862. Ellis Harvill, Ordinary

August 5, 1862
Macon Daily Telegraph
-Excerpt
Whereas Willis Allen of said State and county, applies to me for Letters of Administration on the estate if Ira E. Perry, deceased, late of said county and State.
the 29th of July, 1862. Ellis Harvill, Ordinary

August 5, 1862
Macon Daily Telegraph
-Excerpt
Whereas E. J. Holland, of said State and county, applies to me for Letters of Administration on the estate of William G. Holland, late of said county, deceased:
this 29th July, 1862. Ellis Harvill, Ordinary.

August 5, 1862
Macon Daily Telegraph
Georgia, Wilkinson County
     Notice is hereby given to all persons concerned that on the first day of June, 1861, William Ussery, late of Wilkinson county, departed this life intestate, and no person having applied for administration on the estate of William Ussery, and that in terms of the law administration will be vested in the Clerk of the Superior Court or some other fit and proper person, thirty days after the publication of this citation unless some valid objection is made to his appointment.
  Given under my hand and official signature this 3d of July, 1862. Ellis Harvill, Ordinary

August 12, 1862
Macon Daily Telegraph
-Excerpt
 Whereas Leah N. Cumming and C. Cumming applies to the undersigned for Letters of Administration on the estate of
R. L. Cumming, deceased, late of said county and state.
29th July, 1862. Ellis Harvill, Ordinary

August 18, 1862
Southern Recorder
MARRIED. In Wilkinson county, on the 10th inst., by Wm. A. Batson, Esq., Mr. JOSEPH SLAID  and Miss MARTHA MANDERSON.

August 22, 1862
Georgia Weekly Telegraph
DIED
On Tuesday the 19th inst. at the residence of her husband, in Wilkinson county, Ga., in the 18th year of her age, Julia Elilla, wife of Dr. James A. Damour, after a brief but painful illness.

August 22, 1862
Georgia Weekly Telegraph
From the 14th Georgia
The following is a letter from Robert Solomon, of the 14th Georgia, to his father in Wilkinson county:
Dear Father-We have just passed through another fight, and nobody hurt of our company, except John Young-shot in the knee-slight. We gave the Yanks a severe whipping. We had a fine open field fight of it-face to face. Our regiment repulsed a charge of cavalry, and emptied nearly every saddle. All ready again. We took 1500 prisoners. Joel Hawthorne was slightly wounded by a shell. We just slayed the Yankees. Love to all - in great haste.

August 22, 1862
Georgia Weekly Telegraph
-excerpt
Whereas, William N. Isler, Guardian of Nancy Jane Cannon, a minor of said county, having fully discharged his trust, applies to be dismissed from his Guardianship as aforesaid:
August 19th, 1862. Ellis Harvill, Ordinary

August 22, 1862
Georgia Weekly Telegraph
-excerpt
Whereas, Isaac Lindsey, of said county, applies to me for Letters of Administration on the estate of Hyram Meadows, deceased, late of said county and State:
this August 19th, 1862. Ellis Harvill, Ordinary

August 29, 1862
Georgia Weekly Telegraph
-excerpt
Whereas, Wyatt Mearideth, Guardian of the person and property of William H. Sears, a minor of said county, having fully discharged his trust, applies to be dismissed from his Guardianship as aforesaid.
August 19, 1862, Ellis Harvill, Ordinary

August 29, 1862
Georgia Weekly Telegraph
-excerpt
Whereas M. J. Carswell, Guardian of the person and property of Mary K. Carswell, a minor of said county, having full discharged his trust, applies to be dismissed from his Guardianship as aforesaid:
this 29th July, 1862. Ellis Harvill, Ordinary

September 1, 1862
Macon Daily Telegraph
Died, At his residence in Wilkinson county, Ga., on Wednesday the 27th of August, 1862, Joel Butler, Esq., in the seventy-fifth year of his age.

From Christian Advocate
(and Georgia Weekly  Telegraph Sep 5, 1862)
---
  Thomas Lewis a resident of Dooly County, Georgia, died at the Huguonot Springs, Virginia August 7, 1862 of typhoid dysentery born in Greene County January 19, 1804 being in his 59th year.The deceased has been from the time of our separation from the old government, devoted to our Sunny South and one among the foremost to contribute to the support of the new government. He had made three trips to Virginia to visit and administer to a fond son who had early volunteered in defense of his country and who had been for months prostrated with disease, and had exerted himself a great deal in arranging matters properly to return home with his afflicted son, and on the eve of his starting for home was taken down when death "claimed him as his own, far away from his family save his sick son, in a distant land there to rest until the last Trump"shall sound and bid the sleeping millions rise. Mr. Lewis was not a member of any church, but a professor of the religion of the Lord Jesus Christ. His faith was that of the Primitive Baptist, though a constant attendant of the house of worship among the different denotations. He has left a wife and three sons and a daughter besides innumerable friends to mourn his loss, which will be felt by more than soldiers families. He was always one among the first to contribute to their necessities. But weep not, dear friends, for we feel assured that our friend only sleeps to awake and shine forth at the last day.
Comment: Thomas Lewis was the son of Richard Lewis and Elizabeth Ann Rogers, submitted by Carolyn Hinson

September 16, 1862
Southern Recorder
Died, in Winder Hospital, near Richmond, Va., of typhoid fever, on the 8th of July, ELLIOTT H. GREEN, son of Cason and Eliza Green, of Wilkinson county, in the 23d year of his age. The deceased was a Sergeant in Captain Player's Company, which left Irwinton the 10th of March. He was in the Chickahominy battle, fought on the 31st May, and in the commencement of the great battle, fought near Richmond, when taken sick. He was  a noble young man in the Confederate Army. E. G.

September 19, 1862
Georgia Weekly Telegraph
SAD ACCIDENT. Lieut. Thomas Bell, of Cuthbert fell from the platform of the down train on the Central Railroad, when near Gordon, on Friday night, and was severely injured in the head. He was brought back by the return train the same night, and expired Saturday morning. He was, we understand, a very estimable young man, and we deeply regret the said catastrophe.

September 19, 1862
Georgia Weekly Telegraph
Georgia, Wilkinson County: Sixty days after date application will be made to the Ordinary of said county for leave to sell all the land and negroes belonging to the estate of Joel Butler, late of said county, deceased, not disposed of by will.
September 2d, 1862 George W. Butler, Executor.

August 26, 1862
Southern Recorder
~excerpt~ SIX MILES FROM CULPEPER C. H. Va. August 10, 1862
Eds. Constitutionalist - Dear Sir: You will please find enclose a list of casualities in the 49th Regiment Georgia Volunteers in the battle at this point on yesterday, for publication. The regiment was under the command of Lieut. Col. Manning, of Pulaski county - Col. Lane having been wounded at Mechanicsville. and Major Rivers being taken prisoner at the battle on the Darbytown road.
Co. A.. from Wilkinson county - killed W. L. Long, J. B. Stinson, John Goodwin.
 Wounded - L. E. Lord, in arm, severely; M. J. Cannon, in both thighs, slightly; Ira Wheeler, in hand slightly; J. E. Dixon, in hand, flesh wound; S. J. Brooks, Slightly in left breast.

October 1, 1862
Macon Daily Telegraph
List of Casualties in the 14 Reg't Vols in the battles of Manassas Plains August 29 and 30, Chantilly, Sept. 1, Harpers Ferry, Sept 15 and Shepherdstown  Sept 20th, 1862.
Company B Ramah Volunteer Guards
Aug 29 - Killed, Private Wm Wheeler. Wounded, Privates: Thos Sharpe, slightly in thigh; W B Jones severely in both legs; David Welch, slighly in hip; E Mixon, slightly in shoulder
Sept 1st - R Dixon, slightly in hand
Sept 15 - D F Christian, slightly in scalp
Sept 20th - R Myrick, slightly on heel; H Dykes, slightly in hip
Private Eli Lockley, Co. S, 12th S Ca Vols having become separated from his regiment, on Friday the 29th, went into action with Co. B, 14th Georgia, and was killed while gallantly fighting in their ranks

November 7, 1862
Georgia Weekly Telegraph
-excerpt
Whereas Elisabeth F. Lisenby, of said State and County applies to the Ordinary for Letters of Administration on the estate of J. R. Lisenby's estate, late of said county.
this Oct. 31st, 1862. Ellis Harvill, Ordinary

November 7, 1862
Georgia Weekly Telegraph
-excerpt
Whereas D. E. Miller, of said County, applies to the Ordinary for Letters of Administration on the estate of F. P. Miller, deceased, late of said county.
this 27th day of October, 1862, Ellis Harvill, Ordinary

November 28, 1862
Georgia Weekly Telegraph
-excerpt
Whereas Sarah A. Lewis, of said State and County, applies to the Ordinary for Letters of Administration on the estate of James R. Lewis deceased, late of said county and State.
Nov. 22d, 1862. Ellis Harvill, Ordinary

November 7, 1862
Georgia Weekly Telegraph
-excerpt
Whereas Martha Graves, of said State and County applies to the Ordinary for Letters of Administration on the estate of Richard Graves,
this the 22d Nov. 1862
Ellis Harvill, Ordinary

November 7, 1862
Georgia Weekly Telegraph
-excerpt
Whereas Margaret Collins, applies to the Ordinary of the said State and County for Letters of Administration on the estate of Jasper Collins, deceased, late of said County and State.
22d of November, 1862. Ellis Harvill, Ordinary

November 7, 1862
Georgia Weekly Telegraph
-excerpt
Whereas Elizabeth Hursting   and B. O. Bannion, apply to the Ordinary for Letters of Administration on the estate
of Alexander Hursting, deceased, late of said County and State.
this the 22d November, 1862. Ellis Harvill, Ordinary

November 7, 1862
Georgia Weekly Telegraph
State of Georgia, Wilkinson County:
On first Tuesday in January will be sold at the Court House door in the town of Irwinton, Wilkinson County, between the usual hours of sale, the following property to-wit
  One Negro man, named Sam, about thirty five years of age, good field hand, sold for the purpose of making a division amongst the heirs of Polley Watters, late of said county, deceased. This 22nd November, 1862. Lowe Herndon, Executor

December 12, 1862
Georgia Weekly Telegraph
-excerpt
Whereas Jasper N. Wall applies to the undersigned guardianship on the person and property of George Davis, minor child of Shorter Davis, deceased.
2nd December, 1862. Ellis Harvill, Ordinary

December 19, 1862
Georgia Weekly Telegraph
-excerpt
Whereas Sarah A. Smith of said county and State applies for Letters of administration on the estate of C.D. Smith.
December, 1862. Ellis Harvill, Ordinary

December 31, 1862
Macon Daily Telegraph
List of Causalities in the 14th Reg't before Richmond December 13, 1862
Company B
Capt Charles C. Kelly, con'g Killed (not killed); Leonard Barnett
Wounded - Lieut. W J Solomon, mortally in head
Privates: John Sanders, severely in wrist; R Dixson, in breast by shell; J M Flemister, slightly in hand; John Myers, thumb shot off;
I T Smith, slightly in thigh; E R Nixon, slightly in shoulder; Jas. Wilson, slightly in breast; Thos Smallwood, slightly in arm.
Total loss, 10



1863
January 15, 1863
Macon Daily Telegraph
Guardian's Sale
Will be sold before the Court House door in Irwinton, Wilkinson County, within the usual hours of sale, on the first Tuesday in March next, the following negroes belonging to the estate of James H. Stanley, late of said County, deceased.
Jim, a likely man, aged 31 years
Lucy and 3 children, aged 23 years
Martha (Idiot) 19 years
Eliza, woman, 48 years
Tempy, girl, 9 years
Elizabeth, girl, 7 years
Sold by virtue of an order from the Ordinary of Lawrence (sic) County. Terms on the day of sale.
A H. Cumming, Guardian of J. H. Stanley, deceased. Irwinton, Ga., 6th January, 1863.

January 23, 1863
Georgia Weekly Telegraph
-excerpt
Georgia, Wilkinson County. Whereas Emeline Underwood  petitions me for  Letters of administration on the estate of
T. B. Underwood, late of said County deceased. December 26, 1862. Ellis Harville, Ordinary

January 23, 1863
Georgia Weekly Telegraph
-excerpt
Georgia, Wilkinson County. Whereas Sarah A. Green  petitions me for  Letters of administration on the estate of
Cullen Green, late of said County deceased. December 26, 1862. Ellis Harville, Ordinary

January 23, 1863
Georgia Weekly Telegraph
-excerpt
Georgia, Wilkinson County. Whereas James Stinson petitions me for  Letters of administration on the estate of Henry Ward, late of said County deceased. December 26, 1862. Ellis Harville, Ordinary

January 30, 1863
Georgia Weekly Telegraph
-excerpt
Georgia, Wilkinson County. Whereas M. A. Thompson, applies to me for Letters of Guardianship of the person and property of James M. Thompson, minor son of William M. Thompson, late of said County, deceased.
22nd January, 1863, Ellis Harvill, Ordinary

-excerpt Whereas, Dennis Busbee applies to the undersigned for letters of Guardianship of the person and property of James W. Collins, minor child of Enoch Collins, late of said County, deceased.
25th January, 1863. Ellis Harvill, Ordinary

-excerpt
Whereas Tebbey and Silas Sanders applies to me for the Letters of Administration on the estate of Daniel Sanders, deceased. 25th January 1863. Eillis Harville, Ordinary

-excerpt
Whereas David Solomon of said County and State applies to me for letters of administration on the estate of W. J. Solomon, deceased.
25th January, 1863, Ellis Harvill, Ordinary

February 2, 1863
Georgia Weekly Telegraph
-excerpt
Whereas Elbert Fowler of Washington County and said State, petitions the undersigned for Letters of Administration upon the estate of John Fowler, late of Wilkinson County, deceased. 28th day of January, 1863. Ellis Harvill, Ordinary

February 6, 1863
Georgia Weekly Telegraph
-excerpt
Wheres E. Cumming, of said County and State, applies to me for Letters of Administration on the estate of Wm. N. Smith, deceased, of late of said county. 30th January, 1863. Ellis Harville, Ordinary

February 14, 1863
Georgia Weekly Telegraph
-excerpt
Whereas Iverson L. Harville applies to me for letters of administration on the estate of H. W. Harvill, deceased, late of said county. 22nd January, 1863. Ellis Harvill, Ordinary

February 24, 1863
Georgia Weekly Telegraph
-excerpt
Whereas Leah Keyton applies to me for Letters of Administration on the estate of W. H. Keyton, deceased, late of said County. January 30, 1863. Ellis Harvill, Ordinary

March 2, 1863
Georgia Weekly Telegraph
-excerpt
Whereas E. Cumming of said State and County applies to me for Letters of Administration de bonis non, on the estate of
John Lavinder, deceased, late of said county. January 30th, 1863. Ellis Harvill, Ordinary

March 3, 1863
Southern Recorder
CAMP NEAR U.S. FORD VA.
Feb 13th, 1863
To the Relatives of deceased soldiers in Company F. 3d Regt. Ga. Vol. (Williamson [Wilkinson] Rifles)
  Where members of the company has been killed or died in service and are entitled to pay, their representatives can get the pay by observing the following directions.
  While there is anything due a deceased soldier let the Wife, Parent or legal representative go before a magistrate and make affidavit that he or she is the wife, parent or legal representative of said deceased who belonged to Co. F. 3d Regt. Ga. Vol., and that he or she is legally entitled to receive his money and have the fact attest and send the affidavit to the second auditor of the Treasury, Richmond, Va. and a check will be sent for the amount.
  When the amount exceeds one hundred dollars there will have to be an administrator appointed. The following members of the Wilkinson Rifles are entitled to pay from April 30th, 1862.
   Sergt. J. Meredith, wounded July 1st, died Aug. 10th.
   Corpl. J. H. Shepherd, died June 21st.
   Private B. F. Cannon, killed in skirmish June 18th.
   Private J. M. Breewer (Brewer), killed in Battle July 1st.
   Private W. L. Golden, killed in Battle July 1st.
   Private A. P. Gilbert, killed in Battle July 1st.
   Musician G. E. Schmidt, killed in battle July 1st.
   Private J. F. Phillips, killed in skirmish June 18th.
   Private R. Rosenburg, killed in skirmish June 18th
   Private B. T. Gilbert, died in hospital June 29th
   Private H. N. Garrett, died in hospital June 27
   Private T. F. Holder, died in hospital June 25
   Private R. H. Spence, died in hospital June 26th.
   Private B. J. Dupree, wounded July 1st, died July 25
   Private C. M. Herndon, wounded July 1st died July 25th
   J. R. Penington (Pennington), wounded Sept. 17th, died Sept. 20th.
   D. J. Adkins died in hospital Nov. 4th.
J. A. MASON, Lieut. Comdg. Co. F. 3d  Regt. Ga. Vol.

March 10, 1863
Georgia Weekly Telegraph
~extract
Whereas, A. C. Brown and Ruth M. Brown, applies for Letters of Administrator upon the estate of Nimrod J. Brown, late of said county deceased.
this 3rd day of March 1863. Ellis Harvill, Ordinary.

May 14 1863
Macon Daily Telegraph
Causalities, Wright's Brigade May 2, 3 and 4 Chancellorsville
Co. F.
Sergt J. T. Haston, slightly
Privates: H F Sheppard, slightly; J U Parker; N T Whitaker; L M Etheridge; L Jordan
Co. I
Sergt W O'Bannon, wounded in breast
Privates: T Dickson, slightly; J G Gates, severely in arm; I N Lindsay, slightly

May 27, 1863
Georgia Weekly Telegraph
-excerpt
Whereas, Calvin Dean applies to me for Letters of Administration on the estate of Rebecca Garret, late of said county, deceased. 24th day of April, 1863. Ellis Harvill, Ordinary

-excerpt
Rob. N. Parker having in proper form applied to me for permanent letters of administration, on the estate of William T. Parker, late of said County, deceased. 24th of April, 1863. Ellis Harvill, Ordinary

-excerpt
Sixty days after date application will be made to the Honorable the Court of Ordinary of said county, for leave to sell all the lands belonging to the estate of J. A. J. Collins, late of said County, deceased, for the benefit of the heirs and creditors of said estate. Margret Collins, Wm. B. Ryle, Administrators

~excerpt
Court of Ordinary of said County, for leave to sell the land and Negroes belonging to the estate of James R. Lewis, late of said county, deceased. Sarah A. Lewis, Administratrix

Macon  Daily Telegraph
May 28, 1863
Loss of the 57th Georgia Regiment  at the battle near Champion's farm, 20 miles east of Vicksburg, Miss.,  Saturday, May 16th, 1863,
Col. Wm. Barkuloo, commanding.  Field and staff  - Adjutant Thomas J. Dyson - mortally wounded and left on the field.
   Company A  Lieut. Robert H. Harris, commanding.
 Killed: James R. Beasley; N. M. McLeod; James M. Wombell.  Wounded: Lt. E. T. Davis, leg, slightly; Corporal N J W Brown, shoulder. Privates: Thomas N. Lewis, leg shot off, captured and paroled; B. F. Oswold leg; William Rowlin, head, captured and paroled S. T. Stanerland, side, very slightly.  Prisoners: Serg'rts J. O. G. Lewis; J. W. Patterson; Private N. Dugger
    Company B  Lieut V C Manning, commanding.  Killed: Lieut V C. Manning; Serg't John L. Stewart. Wounded: Privates: Richard Warnock, shoulder; Thomas S. Gornto, arm, captured and paroled; Moses L. pope, arm; Russell B. Jones,  shoulder.
 Missing: James T. Thigpen; Richard S. Thigpen; M. T. Thigpen; John English
   Company C  Lieut. Kellum, commanding
Killed: Lieut W. Hobbs; Corporal W Q Price; Privates: James R. Withington; J T Boatwright; John W Walker
 Wounded:   Lieut A L Morgan, foot, slightly; Serg't John Hobbs, shoulder; Privates: W S Grabar, arm; A B Walker; Thomas B Winham; W M  Smith; Joshua J Underwood, color bearer, thigh, severely; A Hutchinson; M Hightower, thigh; S Maddox, arm; L Hobbs, leg; R N  Smith, hip; W W L Underwood, hip;  The above privates all captured and paroled.   Joshua Hutchinson, shoulder; F J Bass; G S Young, knee, slightly; Missing: Serg't T W Holmes; Privates: C Aligood; Thomas Brantley
   Company D Capt. H K Byington, commanding
 Killed: Privates: J B F McCarthy; B F Butler; J E Mercer.  Wounded, captured and paroled: Corp'l A Stucky, knee; Privates: J K Holder; M Bullock, arm; John Brooks, thigh.  Wounded: D K Wall, shoulder; W J Garret, arm; W A Cutler, thigh; H Howard, knee; Irie King, arm; J E Jackson, neck, slightly.  Missing: Lieut. W K Mehone; Privates: A Bullock; O Z Horn; I T Thompson; M N Thompson; A Brown; J H Freeman; A J Helton; J  Holloman
   Company E,  Lt. Branham, commanding
 Killed: Serg't F R Murray; Privates: W Holly; A English; J C Waldon.  Wounded: Seargeant S Mimms, thigh; Corporal H C Harris, nose; Privates: A F Lightfoot, arm; W J Algers, thigh and face; J A Booker, hand; A  Henderson, arm; J W McCallum, arm; J D Murray, shoulder; B G Avery, the two last captured and paroled.  Prisoners: B Brookins; F Hardeman.  Missing:  Lieut W J Anderson; Sergeant V A Harvey; Privates J A Jones ; T Booker; W F Horn
   Company F Captain J B Fowler, commanding
Killed: Privates: W L Walton; M Connor.  Wounded: Captain J B Fowler, leg, slightly; Corporal T R Bryce; Privates: A J Bryant, arm; W W Brown, arm; H J Crawford, leg; W  H Hancock, side .  Also wounded, captured and paroled: Privates: P C Bryce, leg; J M McGhee arm; D B Nichols, hip; W J Piles, thigh; B B Scofill, thigh;  J W Vinson, arm, severely; J W Gatling;
 Prisoners: Serg't O R Joiner; Corporal James Stembridge; Privates: D W Bryce; G T Barnes; W J Dunn; H T Gray; E S Matthews;
 Jos T Perkins; G T Barnes.  Missing: Privates: John Becham; J N Matthews
     Company G   Captain J P Jordan, commanding
 Killed: Private Thomas E. Rogers.  Wounded: Serg't John J. Jordan, head, severely, captured and paroled; Also Privates George Proctor, thigh; L Joiner, hip; S Cowart, finger shot off.  Wounded: Corporal G J Moye, thigh; Privates: Wm. Mixon, leg; P. Whitfield, back slightly.  Prisoners: Capt. J P Jordan; Serg't W English.  Missing: Sergt H J Bell; Corp J T Christie; Privates: W R Robinson; N R Robinson; N R Rogers; John McGowan
     Company H   Capt. J R Bonner, Commanding
 Killed: Privates: H M Chambers; V E Collins, H Russell; Wm Stifner.  Wounded: Capt. J R Bonner, leg; Lieut A C McKinney, shoulder; Lieut L F Choice, arm; Privates:  S S Jones, leg; B Stanley, groin.   Wounded, captured and paroled: Corp. S S Collins, leg; Privates: J E Chambers; K Digby, abdomen; H Huntington, leg; Joseph Martin; Samuel Russel; Jos Russel.  Missing: Corp S W Carlisle; Privates: R Brown; C Digby; G Dunn; B H Harper; Jas Russel; R A Woodall
    Company I  Lieut. Vinson, Commanding
 Killed: Privaee A J Whaffey. Wounded: Privates: G B Daniel, arm; F Fordham, hip; A Byram, finger; B E Metts, shoulder
 Wounded, captured and paroled: Privates: J L Pharris, thigh; J H Taylor, thigh and shoulder; Geo S Watkins, knee, badly
 Prisoner Private Samuel Hooker.  Missing : Wm Bryan; Robert Council; J Fordham; W R Scarbrough
     Company K Capt. Shinholster, Commanding
 Killed: Private John Mullhem.  Wounded, captured and paroled: Lieut A J Miller, leg; Lieut John Lord, head; Serg'ts: W S Pearce, chest; Isaac W Davis.  Privates: A J Allen, foot; J T Bloodworth, shoulder; J E Hancock, hand and foot; Allen Holder; George Stapleton, thigh.  Wounded: Sergt. John L. White, arm; Privates: A G F Ackridge, thigh; Jas D Bales, eye, slightly; W B Carr, chest; J A Davis, arm; V Q Golden, arm; S B Gunn, arm; J C Holland, abdomen; S L Kingrey; W M G Phillips, leg; John Statpleton, arm
 Prisoner: J T Kirkpatrick.  Missing: Corp A J Arrington; Privates: W J Allen; J M Day; Elisha Jeans; A T Kingrey; D Lord; Wm Lavander; P J Lingold; William  J Underwood; W W Weaver; S P Wheeler
    Total killed, 27; wounded, 104; prisoners, 16; missing, 50 - total loss, 197
    There may be a few errors in this list, but I think it is very nearly correct. This Regt. went into the battle with about 450 men,
 and with the bravery with which it fought may be inferred from its heavy loss. It stood in the thickest of the fire, and was, I believe,
 the last to leave the field. It was led with distinguished coolness and gallantry by its intrepid Colonel, and its other field officers.
 being overpowered by numbers, our forces were compelled to fall back to Vicksburg, and several days' hard fighting since then has
 doubtless much further thinned their ranks. All that brave and determined men can do will be done to hold the place not without
 strong probability of success. Let us pray that the God of  hosts may give them a glorious victory.
 F H. Ivey, Chaplain 57th Ga.

June 24, 1863
Georgia Weekly Telegraph
-excerpt
Whereas, W. W. Collins applies to me for Letters of Administrator on the estate of Columbus Collins, late of said county, deceased.
4th day of June, 1863. Ellis Harvill, Ordinary

~excerpt
  Whereas William J. Golden, applies to the undersigned for Letters of Administration on the estate of F. E. Golden and
W. L. Golden, late of said County, deceased.  4th day of June 1863, Ellis Harvill, Ordinary

June 24, 1863
Macon Weekly  Telegraph
Georgia, Wilkinson County: Sixty days after date hereof application will be made to the Court of Ordinary for said County, for leave to sell the lands belonging to the estate of Oren Davis, late of said County.
JAMES C. BOWER, ELIZA DAVIS, Administrators.

June 24, 1863
Macon Weekly  Telegraph
~excerpt
Whereas John R. Bragg, Administrator de bonis non of Samuel Bragg, late of said County and State, applies to me for Letters of dismission from said trust. April 24th, 1863. Ellis Harvill, Ordinary. april 27

June 29, 1863
Georgia Weekly Telegraph
~excerpt
  Whereas Love Herndon Administrator on the estate ofRobert B. Herndon, deceased, applies to me for Letters of Dismission from said trust. 24th day of April, 1863.  Ellis Harvill, Ordinary

June 30, 1863
Macon Weekly Telegraph
NOW IS YOUR CHANCE. I Offer for Sale my House and Lot, with 10 Acres of Land attached, situated in the town of Irwinton, Wilkinson county, Ga. It is the best Lot in the town, with all the necessary outbuildings, good Water, &c. I also will sell 200 Acres of Land, lying one mile from town, one half cleared and under fence, the balance good woodland, all lying about three miles from No. 16 on the C.R. Road. For particulars address the undersigned, or call and see
G.W. BUTLER, Irwinton, GA. june 19

July 2, 1863
Macon Daily Telegraph
Georgia, Wilkinson County: Superior Court, April term, 1863. William W. Collins vs. Nancy Collins. Libel for Divorce, Rule to Perfect Service.
It appearing to the Court, by the return of the Sheriff that the defendant does not reside in this county, and it further appearing that she does not reside in this state, it is, on motion of counsel, ordered that said defendant appear and answer at the next term of this court, else that this case will be considered in default, and the plaintiff allowed to proceed. And it is further ordered that this Rule be published in the Macon Telegraph once a week for four months.
   A true extract from the Minutes of Wilkinson Superior Court, April Term, 1863. Geo. W. Tarpley, Clerk. june 5.

July 7, 1863
Southern Recorder
$5 Reward. LEFT the residence of the subscriber on the night of the 13th inst., my boy CLEM. Whether or not he was enticed to leave by white men is entirely unknown; suffice it to say, that Clem is out and gone. Clem is 29 years old, 5 feet high, jet black complexion, high cheek bones, sunken jaws, glaring eyes, large flat nose, very thick lips and prominent heels. Clem is slow to move, slow to hear, and slow to speak.
  I was engaged in raising poultry, and relying on Clem's loyalty, furnished him with a fine revolving rifle (which he carried with him) and cartridges, and assigned to him the post of guarding my poultry yard. Clem was seen with his gun Sunday morning at Mrs. Holton's, Wilkinson co., Ga., and it is thought he is yet not far from that place. The above reward will be paid for the delivery of Clem and gun to me at my residence. NEDDIE SHEFFIELD, Stephensville, Ga. , June 23, 1863.

July 15 1863
The Macon Daily Telegraph
Richmond July 13, Casualties in the Third Georgia Gettysburg
Company I Carswell Guards
Capt. Carswell, wounded in both thighs

July 22, 1863
The Macon Daily Telegraph
~excerpt
List of Casualties in The Third Georgia Regiment Cos F and I  Gettysburg
Company F Wilkinson Rifles
Killed:  James Lord; Jacob Gainey. Missing: Leroy Jordan; R. J. Lewis
Wounded:  J M McCue wounded in arm; J T Nesbit, in body; C C Parker, slightly; C F Parker, slightly in eye; T W Stephens, pretty severally; G M Williams, in neck and shoulder; L S Wood, slightly; Corpl. E B Cannon, severely; J F Branan, severely in side and back; J J Brewer, in arm; J McCook, in leg; Ira Chambers, flesh wound in arm; Eli J Davis, missing, wounded in both thighs; C M Davis, shoulder, dangerously; H A Hartley, in jaw; J T Hatfield, missing;
Company I Wilkinson Rifles
Killed: J R Sutton; T Dixon; J B Horn; J T Reed;
Missing: J A Lindsey; B F Brack; E Brack; J R Etheredge; Jasper Jordan; J M Lord; W G Sanders; D Watkins; Adam Sanders; J F Walters; S T Brooks
Wounded:
Captain W E Carswell, shot through thigh by a peace of shell, not dangerously; R A Price, shoulder;Pleman Nesbit, contusion in hip;
M A  Fleetwood, flesh wound in thighs; Thos Carr, in hand and arm; Jasper Garrett, slightly in hand; John Mathis, in hand;
W A Skipper, lost left arm; James Williams, in arm

July 23, 1863
Macon Daily Telegraph
Casualties of the 49th Regiment Georgia Volunteers in the late Fights before Richmond
~extract
Company A
Col. A. J. Lane, severely wounded, Maj. J. Rivers, prisoner.
Company A: J. Shepard, mortally wounded; W J Canon, J L Wynn, J Warner, E Parot, E J Davis, T, Allen, B. King, slightly
  In making out the above report, it is with a good considerable degree of difficulty that I have been able to furnish as correct a list as is here presented. A goodly number of the wounded being sent to different Hospitals, and the only means of ascertaining the extent of wounds, from the report of those present. It is but justice to say, that the Regiment at any time carried into action more that two hundred and seventy-five. This proves how severely the Regiment suffered, losing near one-third of the number engaged; some fifty being on detached service as litter corps, and other details. The wounded was made as comfortable as could be possibly done upon the field-all bore their wounds with the utmost degree of fortitude, submitting to operations without a murmur.- The Surgeons of this brigade acted with due courtesy to each other, allowing no one even of a different brigade to escape dressing, when presenting themselves. Dr. Charles Hall, of Milledgeville, Ga., our acting brigade Surgeon, endeared himself to all, by his kindness to his medical brethren, and his promptness to have the wounded attended to; he is a neat and active operator. As a correct report will be furnished of the conduct of the regiment while engaged in action, I defer giving any details, my time being occupied in relieving the wounded. I can not possibly do them justice, not being an eye-witness to only part of the engagement. R. H. PATE, Act'g Sur. 49th Reg't Ga., Vol.

August 7, 1863
Macon Weekly Telegraph
Casualties in the Battle of Gettysburg July 1st, 2nd and 3rd 1863
14th Georgia Regiment Company B
Wounded - Sergt M A Whitaker, severely in leg; Corporal A J Ryle, dangerously, thigh

49th Georgia Regiment Company A
Killed - Corp C T Johnson
Wounded: Sergt B King, leg; J G Miller, leg and thigh; J B Robertson, thigh; Ira Wheeler, thigh; J L Davis, eye; S J Brooks, hand
Missing: Lieut I L Burney; Lt J T Hughes; Corpl J T Green; Privates: J Adams; J M Cates; E J Davidson; S B Justice; J W Underwood; U S Wynn; N L Smith; A W Spear

September 7, 1863
Georgia Weekly Telegraph
Georgia Wilkinson County: Notice is hereby given to all persons concerned, that sometime during the year 1862, J.A. J. Carr, late of said county, departed this life intestate, and no person has applied for administration on the estate of said J. A. J. Carr, and that in terms of the law administration will vest in the Clerk of the Inferior Court, or some other fit and proper person, at the next October term of said Court of Ordinary, unless some valid objection is made to his appointment.
Given under my hand and official signature, this 27th August, 1863. Ellis Harvell, Ordinary.

September 17, 1863
The Macon Weekly Telegraph
MARRIED. In Baldwin county, Ga., on the 15th inst, by Rev. Wm. Griffin, Mr. C. N. Solomon, of Gordon, Ga., to Miss G. P. Jolly, of Panola, Miss.

October 7 1863
Georgia Weekly Telegraph
~excerpt
 Whereas, Benjamin Fordham, of said State and county, applies to me for letters of administration on the estate of John T. Payne, deceased, late of said county.
  this 29th September, 1863. Ellis Harvill, Ordinary.

October 7 1863
Georgia Weekly Telegraph
~excerpt
Whereas, Manday Smith, applies to me for letters of administration on the estate of David Smith, deceased, late of said county and State.

October 23, 1863
Macon Weekly Telegraph
~extract
Wilkinson Superior Court, Grand Jurors, October Term 1863
D. Huson, Foreman; Bryant O'Bannon; Rufus H. Carswell; John Mithvin; Thomas Whitehurst; Mathew J. Carswell; Miles M. Bloodworth; Samuel Hatfield; Wm. E. Carswell; Wm. W. Whitaker; Wm. Dickson; Wm. Collins; Anderson R. Brundage; Josiah H. Jones; James Pierce; James N. Hall; Seaborn J. Stubbs; Vincent W. Sharp; James R. Thompson; Geo. W. Tarpley, Clerk (Superior Court)

November 3, 1863
Confederate Union
THUNDERBOLT BATTERY, Oct. 17, 1863
  At a meeting of Co. D., 63d Reg't Ga. vol's the following resolutions were adopted as a tribute of respect to the memory of Private VALENTINE CRUMBLEY, a resident of Wilkinson county, who departed this life at the Medical Hospital, No. 2, in the city of Savannah, the 9th of Oct. 1863, of Typhoid Pneumonia, aged 38 years:
  Resolved, That the deceased was an upright man and faithful soldier, and that to the dispensation of Providence by which we lose a comrade, we bow with profound grief and humble resignation. The deceased belonged to no religious denomination, but often conversed freely upon the subject of religion, and frequently requested one of the company, to pray for and with him privately, and while on his death-bed remarked he was perfectly willing to go.
  Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be forwarded to his bereaved wife and children,  and to the Confederate Union, with the request that they be published. WM. R. VANLANDINGHAM, Chm'r. J. M. SMITH, B. WYNN, Secretaries.

November 30, 1863
Georgia Weekly Telegraph
~excerpt
Whereas James R. Billue, of said county, applies to me for letters of administration on the estate of E. B. Sutton, deceased, late of said county and State. 23d day of October 1863. Ellis Harvill, Ordinary

November 23, 1863
Augusta Chronicle
GEORGIA PRISONERS IN NEW ORLEANS
The Mobile Advertiser and Register published the following list of prisoners who have died or been transferred from the St. Louis Hospital in New Orleans. It is said to have been the dying request of many of them that their families should be informed of their fate:
Died, J. M. Douthier, Company A, 52d Georgia July 21
W. M. Mozes, Company H, 41st Georgia, June 25
S. P. Wilkins, Company B, 52d Georgia, July 24
W. D. Hall, Company D, 57th Georgia, July 25
W.N. Clecker, Company K, 39th Georgia, July 27
Wiley Ballard, Company E, 39th Georgia, July 27
J. M. Anderson, Company K, 5th Georgia, July 28
M.L Watkins, Company A, 36th Georgia, July 28
H. T. Bloodsworthy (Henry P Bloodworth), Company H, 57th Georgia, August 13
Levy Free, Company C, 57th Georgia, July 29
Drury Brodrick, Company C, 39th Georgia, July 22
Perry (Posey) Wilson, Company E, 34th Georgia, August 2
James Seymour, Company A, 34th Georgia, July 22
G. M. Varner, Company K, 29th Georgia, July 22
E. R. Perkins, Company I, 5th Georgia, August 3
Daniel Bruce, Company C, 42nd Georgia, July 24
E. L. Kinney, Company I, 57th Georgia, August 3
J F Childs, Company I, 41st Georgia, July 21
R. T. Bullock, Company G, 42d Georgia, July 21
D. M. Steel, Company B, 42d Georgia, August 11
W. D Douthit, Company H, 52nd Georgia, August 22
     Transferred - Lieut Sylvester Worley, Company I, 39th Georgia  to care Mme Dunbar, Rampart street. J. B. Humphries,  (Campbell) Company K, 41st Georgia, to care Provost Sheriff.

November 26, 1863
Macon Telegraph
MARRIED By the Rev. E. J. Coates, on the evening of the 18th inst., at the residence of the bride's father, Mr. R. H. Carswell, of Wilkinson county, to Miss Jennie Dupree of Twiggs county, Ga.

December 19, 1863
Georgia Weekly Telegraph
~excerpt
Sixty days after the date hereof application will be made to the Hon. Court of Ordinary of said County for leave to sell three Negroes belonging to the estate of W. O. Beall, deceased, to-wit: Bet, a woman, and her two children, Westley and Ed, to pay the debts of said deceased.
T.N. Beall, E. B. Barratt, F. S. Beall, Executors



1864

January 23, 1864
Macon Telegraph
 ~excerpt
Macon, Ga., Jan. 22, 1864
Mr. Clisby: Please allow me through your columns to acknowledge the receipt of the following donations for the sick and wounded in the hospitals under my charge.
  From Mrs Kelly, Mrs Solomon, Mr Nelson, and Miss Jones, of Gordon $25..............
Very respectfully your ob't serv't
James Mercer Green, Sen'r Surg'n in charge Hospitals.

February 8, 1864
Macon Weekly Telegraph
House and Lot For Sale, Situated in the town of Irwinton, Wilkinson county. The lot is well situated, with a new house in fine repair, with large airy rooms. Also, smokehouse, kitchen, negro house, crib and stable, all in good repair. The lot consists of two acres of ground. For particulars apply to T. E. McRea, or G. H. C. Read, Irwinton, Ga.

March 28, 1864
Macon Daily Telegraph
NOTICE. Georgia, Wilkinson County. Ordinary's Office for said County.
Notice is hereby given to all persons concerned, that during the year 1863, M. A. Manson, late of Wilkinson county, departed this life testate, and no person has applied for Administration (the Executor named renouncing) on said estate of  M. A. Manson, and that the terms of law Administration will be vested in the Clerk of the Superior Court, or some other fit and proper person, thirty days after the publication of this citation, unless some valid objection is made to his appointment.
  Given under my hand and official signature this 11th day of March, 1864. JONA. RIVERS, Ordinary.

March 28, 1864
Macon Daily Telegraph
NOTICE.  Will be sold before the Court House door in Irwinton, Wilkinson county, on the first Tuesday in April next, within the usual hours of sale, for negroes, to wit: Bet, a woman and three children, the children very likely. Sold as the property of W. O. Beall, deceased, to pay the debts of said deceased.
T. N. BEALL, E R. BARRATT, P. N. BEALL, Executors

March 28, 1864
Macon Daily Telegraph
~extract    Whereas, C. H. Branan, having applied to be appointed Guardian of the person and property of Sarah E. C. Hogan, a minor under fourteen years of age, resident of said county.
this 3d day of March 1864, JONA. RIVERS, Ordinary.

March 28, 1864
Macon Daily Telegraph
~extract Whereas, Henry E. Hyman, Guardian of the person and property of Mary McIntyre, makes application to me for letters of dismission from his trust as said guardian.
  3d day of March, 1864. JONATHAN RIVERS, Ordinary.

March 28, 1864
Macon Daily Telegraph
~extract Whereas, Wesley King, of said county, applies for letters of Administration on the estate of Henry A. Solomon, late of said county, deceased.
3d day of March, 1864. JONATHAN RIVERS, Ordinary

March 28, 1864
Macon Daily Telegraph
~extract Whereas, James Lord of said county, applies for letters of Administration on the estate of Miles M. Lord, late of said county, deceased.
12th day of March, 1864. JONATHAN RIVERS, Ordinary

March 28, 1864
Macon Daily Telegraph
~extract Whereas John Gainey, Guardian of Daniel McNair having applied to the Court of Ordinary of said county, for a discharge from his Guardianship of Daniel McNair, person and property. this 12th day of March, 1864. JONA. RIVERS.

March 28, 1864
Macon Daily Telegraph
~extract. Whereas, Eason Green applies to be appointed Guardian for the persons and property of Miles R. Cannon, Wm. M. Cannon, Eliza F. Cannon, Sarah J. Cannon, John F. Cannon, and Nancy A. Cannon, minor children of Wiley Cannon, residents of said county.
this 19th March, 1864. JONA. RIVERS, Ordinary

May 5, 1864
Macon Daily Telegraph
~excerpt~ PUBLIC MEETING IN WILKINSON
 A meeting of the citizens of the County of Wilkinson to take some steps to aid the Battle Field Relief Association in the City of Macon, in procuring contributions for wounded soldiers.
Auxillary Battle Field Relief Association
  Dr. Wm. Taylor was appointed President, and James Jackson Vice President, and E. J. Coats requested to act as Secretary.
  Upon motion, a committee of five were appointed to prepare business for the meeting, composing of Jonathan Rivers, Dr. R. J. Cochran, James Lord, J. N. Wall and Willis Allen.
Jona Rivers, Executive Committee
District Committee appointees:
Irwinton  - James G. Ockington
High Hill - J. T. Hughes
Turkey Creek - Willis Allen
Griffin - Thomas W. Dupree
Bloodworth - M. M. Bloodworth
Lords - J. R. Thompson
Ford - S. J. Stubbs
Ramah - J. R. Bragg

July 6, 1864
Macon Daily Telegraph
Contributors to the Battlefield Association
From Wilkinson County
Mrs. Hays, chickens, lard, rags
J Gardner, 2 chickens
B. Rials, 4 doz eggs, rags
J Fountain, flour and butter
J H Hobbs, 1 ham, chickens and eggs
S A Lewis, vegetables, eggs and butter
S J McArthy, 1 ham, eggs
D Solomon delivered the above for Ramer (sic) district.

July 12, 1864
Southern Recorder
DIED, In Wilkinson County, on 7th inst. Col. William W. Williamson, aged 81 years. He formerly represented Twiggs county in the Legislature and after an interval of many years, also represented the county of Cherokee. In 1825 he was appointed by Gov. Troup, a commissioner with Seaborn Jones, W. H. Torrance and Warren Jourdan to investigate the Creek difficulties which led to the death of McIntosh; and was subsequently appointed by Gov. Lumpkin commander of the State Guard to protect the Cherokee nation from trespassing. In 1847 Gov. Towns appointed him Principal Keeper of the Penitentiary. All his public trusts were discharged with zeal and fidelity. Col. W. was a member of the first class that graduated at Franklin College in 1804.
  His remains were interred in the Cemetery near Milledgeville after a funeral discourse by the Rev. C. A. Fulwood at the Methodist Church.

July 19, 1864
Confederate Union
Wayside Home at Gordon. Irwinton, GA., July 7, 1864
  Fellow Citizens of Wilkinson, Twiggs, Jones, Baldwin and Putnam counties:
  As President of the Wayside Home at Gordon, I appeal to you for aid. It would seem to be more than folly to urge upon a people of your known liberality and patriotism, the importance of this laudable undertaking; but I trust I will be excused, as it is not I, but thousands of poor, worn down, hungry, sick and wounded soldiers that call you in thunder tones for help.- This, my countrymen, is the fourth year of the war; for more than three years the very sky once so radiant with peace to our happy homes has been bathed in clouds of smoke from contending armies, the water that for ages past clear as crystal, now runs with the blood of our brothers- Your sons have fallen, but thanks to Almighty God, they have never faltered, or turned their backs ingloriously to the foe. On account overwhelming numbers of a merciless foe, even fathers have been called to the fray; they too  must (many of them) fall. Shall it be said by our prosperity that  we were idle spectators? Ours is a mission of peace-let us with hearts in the cause be able to say, when have I seen thee an hungered and fed thee not? The next few weeks are pregnant with the most fearful events, the scales are almost balanced for weal or for woe. Do we doubt? Shall we falter now? From the beginning of this unholy contest we have professed a cause of justice, humanity, against religion itself-then let us arise do our duty, follow our leader, and fear no danger. God, who rules the destinies of men and nations, now looks down from heaven to behold our conduct. Yea, the thousand departed spirits long since sacrificed upon the altar of their country witness either our loyalty or fidelity; let us be true to their memory.
   The veterans now under Johnston stand as a living breastwork between you and desolation, devastation and destruction.- They are the guardians of your property. In their keeping is, this day, the safety of our wives and daughters, and all that makes life dear to a people. All that they ask in return is mere food and raiment:- Shall we contribute this? We know and appreciate its scarcity but shall we not divide to the last morsel. Ah! many a son and brother has mourned the absence of an angel like mother or sister, when in the last expiring moments of his existence, he was being ministered to by the Samaritans of Virginia and the west.
  On Monday, the 5th inst., a meeting was held at Gordon, and it was determined to organize permanently a Way Side Home at that place.
  The undersigned was chosen as the President. David Solomon, Vice President, and Col. S. T. Player, Secretary, and Treasury. Of myself can be promised but little, but that little I promise freely. Of Judge Solomon may well be said he is a true Christian patriot, having given his offspring true and noble spirits, two of whom have long since yielded their lives on the ensanquined battlefields of Virginia. Yet the surviving old patriot, now 72 years old, offers himself and his means freely to the cause of his country. Col. S. T. Player is true and tried. He has been long and well known in our midst as an honest and upright man, hones in all his dealings. Though never within military age, he has rendered most gallant services to his country on many and well fought battlefields. In his hands you may well entrust your contributions.
  The ladies are alive to their duty, they of course, will principally direct the table and house when started. To the energetic Committee of Wilkinson county, who have been soliciting contributions: David Solomon, Wm. E. Carswell, R. F. Rozar, Thomas W. Dupree, Joel Deese, James Jackson, Alex Barnum (Baum), and M. M. Bloodworth, we are indebted for a very pretty list of subscriptions, and these are respectfully requested to continue their labors until we can relieve them.
  We trust that Twiggs, Jones, Baldwin, and Putnam, and any other county that will, may proceed at once to call meetings (as they were requested by the meeting at Gordon on the 4th, which was omitted in the publication of the proceedings) and organize some means of help to this very important enterprise. To keep an institution like this vast means are required, and we feel that you all are equally interested with us In behalf of the poor soldiers at home I appeal to the christian wherever he may be found, male or females. Help, oh! help, it is the cause of humanity, the cause of religion-in the name of our Lord and Savior to erect and maintain one more monument to live as a pledge of our fidelity to a just cause. Will some gentleman in those counties lead in this good work? In none will, you mothers and sisters put them to shame by taking their place and meet them on the high ways at the corners wherever they go. I know you have not been called on in vain. A gentleman competent and a lady of known merit will have the management and control of the House. A committee of ladies will be in attendance at every meal to soothe and comfort the weary traveller. - And the better to organize these committees, Mrs. R. L. Story, Mrs. John Methvin, Mrs. J. R. Bragg, Mrs. A. C. Flemister, Miss Ella Breazeal, Miss Amelia Fisher, Miss Nanny Jackson and Miss Lizzie Deese are appointed to receive the names of as many as desire to engage in this good work. Transportation will be furnished on the Railroad as soon as we are completely organized. We expect to begin to furnish meals as soon as a house can be  procured and arranged. Now, my country men, perhaps this may be the last call. When your sons and brothers were called for they have been ever ready. You promised to hold up their hands. Now is the time. Think of your famishing son in a foreign land among strangers, and help as you would have him helped. JONA RIVERS, Pres.

July 27, 1864
The Macon Daily Telegraph
For the Daily Telegraph
GORDON WAY SIDE HOME
Mr. Editor - Please publish the following list of contributions to the Gordon Wayside Home.
Dr. A. H. Cumming $200; M J Carswell 200; W E Carswell 200; J F Burney 200; J Rivers 100; A Baum 100; A W Vickers 100;
J G Carswell.100; A McAllum 100; Wesley King 100; Allen Whipple 75; H Wimberly 66.66; Mrs. L H Whipple 66.66; R H Carswell.50
Col John Smith 25; W B Todd 20; John Kemp 10; W A Hall 10; Willis Bullock 6.50; D Solomon 100; J H Jones 100; W M Whitehurst 50; Daniel Brewer 50; V W Tharp 50; W O Charlton 20; H Mercer 10; John Gardner 5; N Reno 10; A  stranger 3.25; Capt Hannah, 18th Tenn. Reg. 10; From Putnam county, by O G Winning 224.75; Total $2,462.82
Also,
Mrs Ellis Harville - crockery ware; Mrs Love Herndon - crockery ware; Mrs Joel Deese - crockery ware; Mrs S J Bush - crockery ware; Mrs J C Bower - crockery ware; Mrs Sue Jordan - crockery ware; Mrs M V Easom - knives and spoon; Mrs L Fleetwood - knives and spoons; Mrs S Russel - 1 large dish; Mrs H Davis - plates and fork; Mrs G H Breazeal - 1 plate, 2 knives and forks
Mrs Dr. A C C Thompson - crockery, knife and fork; Mrs O H P Rawls - 2 plates, cups and saucers, dish and carving knive
Mrs T N Beall - crockery and lampkin; Mrs Eb Mathis - large dish; Mrs Eli Fraseur - dish and plate; Mrs E B Webb - crockery
Mrs F A Ready - crockery and vegetables; Mrs John Barfield - large dish; Mrs Wm. Ryal - 2 plates and eggs
Mrs J McArthur ham, vegetables, eggs, pickles, large coffee pot; Mrs J Rivers crockery - green corn and vegetables
Mrs W H Whitehusrt - large oven, frying pan, 9 pounds butter; Mrs D Solomon - 2 large dishes, spoons, large coffee pot, bread tray, vinegar, soap and vegetables; Mrs A O Flemister crockery - lard; Mrs J R Bragg, crockery; Mrs J T Lingo - crockery
Mrs S T Bragg - crockery; Mrs James Kennington - knife and fork; Mrs J L Brannan - crockery; Mrs W J Smith - crockery
Mrs J Baker crockery; Mrs E Baker - crockery; Mrs Dr Gat?? - crockery; Mrs L Rivers - crockery; Mrs Hollister - crockery
E Waitzfeld & Co. - 23 1/2 homespun; Mrs R Kelly crockery and vegetables; Mrs H King vegetables; Mrs J M Folsom - 1 ham, large dish, pickle dish and green corn; Mrs O N Solomon - ham, butter and vinegar; D Hudson - ham and green peas; Mrs S E Webb - pot and tea kettle; Mrs J H Fountain - vegetables and eggs; Mrs J Bush - vegetables; Gen Jessep - jug syrup; Mrs W O Charlton - chickens, fresh potatoes, vegetables and flour; Mrs J Barfield - crockery and vegetables; Mrs J Ganey - vegetables; Dr. Wm Taylor - vegetables; Mrs V W Tharp - vegetables; Mrs Josiah Whitehurst - vegetables, milk, potatoes and eggs; the Misses Holister - lot bandages; Col N A Carswell - bag wheat, jug syrup; John Fitzpatrick - 8 hams
Jona Rivers, President W.S.H.

July 27, 1864
The Macon Daily Telegraph
Georgia, Wilkinson County. Sixty days after date, application will be made to the Ordinary of said county, for leave to sell the land belonging to the estate of John Hughs, late of said county, deceased. Green B. Hughs, Administrator, May 28, 1864

August 3, 1864
The Macon Daily Telegraph
~excerpt~ Died, at the residence of his father in Wilkinson County, on the 16th ult., Maj. John W. Shinholser, Fifty Seventh Regiment, Georgia Volunteers.

August 9, 1864
Confederate Union
   ~excerpt~ Died on the 21st ult, in the 18th year of his age, J. BRIDGER JONES, eldest son of Josiah Jones of Gordon.

August 9, 1864
Southern Recorder
The Raid on the Central Railroad.
  From a reliable source we gather some facts concerning the late raid on the Central railroad. The raiding party consisting of thirteen regiments of Kentucky, Indiana, and Illinois cavalry, and numbered between six and seven thousand men. They were divided into two brigades, the whole under command of Major General Stoneman, a Yankee who figured somewhat conspicuously in Virginia for his repeated failures on expeditions of a similar nature to the one he now commands. The raiders left Sherman's army on the 26th of last month and marched rapidly through the counties of Newton, Jasper, and Jones. In their march they destroyed no property, although they robbed the people of their horses and jewelry, and supplied themselves with everything necessary for the expedition.
  On arriving about ten miles from Gordon, they halted and detached one hundred men, belonging to an Illinois regiment, and placing them under the command of one Major Davidson, ordered them to destroy all the stations and water tanks from Gordon to the Oconee river, and on their arrival there to burn the bridge. On arriving in sight of Gordon, they discovered a train full of militia was on the way to Milledgeville, followed by a passenger train, and deeming it imprudent to attempt their capture, the raiders concealed themselves on the left of the railroad and allowed both trains to pass unmolested. As soon as they were out of sight they dashed into the town and proceeded in their work of destruction. The warehouse at Gordon was filled with bacon, meal and flour, as also a large amount of furniture, belonging to refugees from Charleston, Savannah, and other points. It was, however, promptly set on fire, by order of Major Davidson, and the whole consumed.
  There was at Gordon from one hundred and fifty to two hundred cars and engines. These were set on fire by the vandals, as well as the car shed and several buildings belonging to and contiguous with the railroad. One train of cars contained a large and valuable lot of machinery. the property of the Western and Atlantic railroad; and another train was laden with a considerable amount of furniture and other household goods belonging to refugees. The raiders then left, supposing their work to be complete and a squad proceeded in the direction of Griswoldville, tearing up the track occasionally as they went, while the main body went on to the Oconee river.- They took along with them, as a guide,  Mr. Walker, the postmaster at Gordon, after robbing him of eleven thousand dollars in Confederate money and his gold watch. His going with them was a compulsory act, the Yankees having threatened him with death if he refused to accompany them and guide the body to Griswoldville. He was afterwards released and returned to Gordon.
  As soon as the raiders had left the town the citizens turned out en masse - both women and men - and set energetically to work to put out the fire. They succeeded admirably. Of the large number of cars at that point only forty were destroyed, while but three engines have been seriously injured; four have been slightly damaged and the remainder untouched. The car shed was saved as well as the buildings set on fire, and the valuable machinery belonging to the Western and Atlantic Railroad was saved to the State. Too much praise cannot be bestowed upon the citizens of Gordon, for the prompt and patriotic manner in which they exerted themselves to put out the fire, and the success which resulted from their united efforts deserves and secures commendation. We regret they were not armed, as our informant says that if they had been, the Yankees raider could never have succeed in doing even the small damage they did.
  On leaving Gordon the squad that marched in the direction of Griswoldville, on arriving in front of that place discovered our skirmisher and promptly attacked them, but finding we had a strong force posted at that point they withdrew and marched round the road, striking it about one and a half miles the other side. When the firing commenced a train of twenty seven cars was very imprudent backed out of Griswoldville and was standing on the track when the squad of men struck the road. This trains was of course captured. The engine was unhitched and the cars set on fire. The men then pushed off in the direction of Griswoldville, and the track being what is termed a "down grade" it entered the town and was entirely consumed, but, fortunately, the fire did not ignite the other cars at the station. We forgot to mention that the Yankees permitted the negroes and railroad employees on the cars to remove all their private property before they set them on fire.
  As soon as the cars were disposed of, the raiders took out nearly all the water from the boiler of the engine and filling the furnace with pie wood, soon get up a small supply of steam. They then compelled a boy to get upon the engine and open the throttle-valve and set it going. The boy did so, jumping off immediately after, and the engine started at full speed for Griswoldville. It entered there under a full headway of steam and struck the rear car of a passenger train, splitting it in two and throwing the two portions on both sides of the track. Continuing the engine threw off two more cars from the train. These two last were filled with women and children, but none were injured. By this time all the steam was exhausted, and the engine ceased moving. The only damage it is reported to have received, is the burning out of the flues. Their work having been completed, the squad started to rejoin their companions.
  In the meantime the other portion under Major Davidson proceeded to McIntyre-Station No. 16, where they tore up a small portion of the track and marched on to Emmet Station No. 15 - where they repeated their work. While at E., twelve of their number were sent to burn the bridge across the Oconee river. This small squad did their work effectually and inflicted the most serious damage done to the road. Why this bridge was left unguarded we cannot conceive. We learn that as late as last Wednesday there was a force of one hundred and fifty men stationed there, and on that evening they were removed and the bridge left unprotected. The inconvenience its destruction will cause can only be a temporary one, as another bridge we learn already prepared, will be promptly substituted in is stead, but for a squad of twelve men to destroy so important a structure is extremely humiliating. We trust that for the future a greater amount of caution will be exhibited.
  After destroying the bridge and tearing up a small portion of the track, the Yankees started back for the main body of the raiders, under Stoneman, who had marched in the direction of Macon. An account of their proceedings around the city will be found in another article. [Macon Telegraph,

August 9, 1864
Southern Recorder
~excerpt~
  From G. I started for Milledgeville, there' byways and plantations, where I arrived at 1 o'clock, P.M. On my way I met Mr. Choate, who piloted the Yanks to Gordon. He is a gentleman of wealth and intelligence. Here is his story: At 7 o'clock PM. the enemy arrived at his house at the junction of the Gordon wagon road with the Macon. They numbered 225, and having force him and a Mr. Wood to mount their horses to act as pilots, started for Gordon, having deprived Choate of all his horses and mules. Wood made his escape, followed by 9 pistol balls, but Choate they closely guarded. The moved rapidly but cautiously; not a word spoken nor an accouterment rattled. They arrived at an old field close to Gordon as General Wayne's train of soldiers passed in. There they remained still as death, until General Wayne passed on to Milledgeville, and the passenger train to Macon, when they dashed in, setting fire to fire to the depot, shed and trains....
  Mr. Choate was taken towards the Oconee but was released at No. 16.

November 29, 1864
Macon Daily Telegraph and Confederate
~excerpt~Whereas, V. B. Tharp having in proper form applied to me for permanent Letters of Administration on the estate of
James Hinson, late of said county, deceased.
this 31st day of October 1864. F. Chambers, Deputy Ordinary

November 29, 1864
Macon Daily Telegraph and Confederate
Administrator's Sale. By virtue of an order from the Hon. Court of Ordinary of Wilkinson county, will be sold before the courthouse door, in the town of Douglass, Coffee county, within the legal hours of sale, on the first Tuesday in January next, lot of land number two hundred and sixty-six, in the first district of original Appling county, now Coffee county, belonging to the estate ofOren Davis, late of Wilkinson county, deceased. Terms cash. Jas. C. Bower, Eliza Davis, Admr's.  Irwinton Ga, Oct. 12, 1864

November 29, 1864
Macon Daily Telegraph and Confederate
Commissioners Sale. Will be sold, by virtue of a decree, in favor ofGeorge W. Butler, David C. Butler, Nimrod Burke, et al, vs James A. Damour, and under an order of the Superior Court of Wilkinson county, for the purpose of making a division among the several parties compiananis in said cause before the courthouse door, in the town of Irwinton, on the first Tuesday in December next, within the legal hours of sale, the following described lands, to-wit: All that settlement of land, well improved, known as the N.C. Hughes place, containing three hundred and two and one-half acres more or less, and being number two hundred seventy five (275) and fractional number two hundred and eighty (280) in the twenty-third district of said county of Wilkinson.
Also. That settlement of land known as the Julius Porter place, containing two hundred and two and a half acres, more or less, and being number two hundred and seventy-four (274) in the twenty-third district of said county of Wilkinson, adjoining the above named lots.
  Terms made known on the day of sale.
James C. Bower, R. F. Rozar, Thomas Hollomon, Commissioners. Irwinton, Oct. 12, 1864.

December 7, 1864
Augusta Chronicle
AN EXPRESS SUPERINTENDENT CAPTURED.-
We regret to learn that E. Hulbert, Esq., the worthy Superintendent of the Central Section of the Southern Express Company, was captured near Gordon, and is now a prisoner in the enemy's hands.

December 8, 1864
Macon Daily Telegraph and Confederate
Administrator's Sale
  By an order of the Court of Ordinary of Wilkinson county, will be sold before the Courthouse door in the town of Irwinton, on the first Tuesday in December next, the following property, to-witt:
  Lot of Land  No. 390, lot No. 391, and part of lot 289, in the Twenty-second District of said county,  and one hundred and fifty acres in the 23d District of said county, being a part of lot No. 265, all making and containing six hundred and fifty-four acres, more or less, Being the place whereon the late Robert A. W. Rozar lived, and joining lands of John Chapman, Levi Galtimore (sic), estate of B. F. Butler and others.
  Also the following Negro slaves to-wit: Green, a man about 48 yrs old; Cinth'a, a woman about 42 yrs old, John, a man about 22, Risey, a woman about 20 and her three children, Lewis 7 yrs, Nathan 5 yrs and Aurelia, 2 yrs old, and Phebe, a woman 55 yrs old. Said property  to be sold as the property of Robert A. W. Rozar, of said county, dec'd, for the benefit of the heirs and creditors of said deceased. Terms cash. R. F ROZAR, Adm'r

December 10, 1864
Macon Daily Telegraph and Confederate
For Sale
Georgia, Wilkinson County
   Pursuant to an order of the Court of Ordinary of said county-Will be sold on the first Tuesday in January next before the Court House door in the town of Irwinton in said county, between the usual hours of sale: 1,225 acres of land, more or less, known as the place whereon Joel Rivers, late of said county lived, two miles south of Gordon, on the road leading from Gordon to Marion, Twiggs county, adjoining Dr. E. J. Massey, David Solomon and others, an elevated healthy location, all necessary buildings on the place with very fine farming land. Also 575 acres, more or less, with a good saw and grist mill attached, Shoats one miles west of Gordon, on the Central Railroad-an excellent location for a mill, with an extensive patronage. All belonging to the estate of Joel Rivers, late of said county, deceased. Sold for the benefit of the heirs and creditors of said estate. Terms on day of sale.
For further particulars, address the undersigned at Gordon, Ga., or call and see him on the premises, or Jona Rivers at Irwinton, Ga. One more corner lot & good plantation in good order for making grain.
W. P. Rivers, Administrator.



1865

January 17, 1865
Confederate Union
MARRIED, On the 12th inst., at the residence of the Bride's Father in Wilkinson county, by T. J. Finney Es'q, MR. JOHN J BOWERS of Baldwin county, and MISS ELIZABETH TAYLOR of the former place.

January 28, 1865
Macon Telegraph and Confederate
Georgia, Wilkinson County. Ordinary's Office for said County.  Notice is hereby given to all persons concerned that on the __ day of 186_, Charles Nesmith, late of Wilkinson county, departed this life intestate, and no person has applied for administration on the estate of Charles Nesmith, and that in terms of the law administration will be vested in the Clerk of the superior Court, or some other fit and proper person, thirty days after the publication of this citation, unless some valid objection is made to his appointment.
  Given under my hand and official signature, this 15th day of December, 1864. JONA RIVERS, Ordinary, W.C.

February 17, 1865
Macon Daily Telegraph and Confederate
~extract. Whereas, Thomas N. Beall, applies to me for letters of Administration on the estate of Elizabeth Beall, late of said county, deceased. 27th day of January, 1865. F. Chambers, Dep. Ordinary.
 

July 16, 1865
The Macon Daily Telegraph
LIST OF TAX IN KIND AGENTS.
  Fourth District
Names, Post Office Address
J. M. Butt Irwinton
T. O. Pearce "
Lewis Flubword (Fleetwood?) "
John H. Taylor "
J. R. Coombs "
David Howard "
R Nelson and M. Hilleson "

September 12, 1865
Federal Union
  ~excerpt~ Departed this life in Gordon, on the 13th Aug., 1865, little JOSIE, infant daughter of J. H. and S. A. Jones, aged two years and eight months. Only one year ago death crossed this threshold and bore away the pride of the household-a noble brother just entering manhood.   (mentions sister Mackie)

September 17, 1865
Macon Telegraph
Married, In Wilkerson county, on the night of the 11th inst., at the bride's father's by the Rev. Wm. Griffin,Mr. J. I. FOUNTAIN and Miss J. R. HATFIELD.

December 26, 1865
Southern Recorder
ADMINISTRATORS SALE - Will be sold on the first Tuesday in February next, before the courthouse door in Irwinton, Wilkinson co., within the legal hours of sale, 101 1/4 acres of lot of land, No. 87, in the 2d district, lying partly in Laurens and partly in Wilkinson counties. Also, one-half lot of land, No. 98, in the 2d district of Wilkinson county; sold as the property of N. W. Cannon, deceased.
  Also, 175 acres of land, more or less, lying in 2d district of Wilkinson county, being part of lot No. 99, in said county; sold as the property of Nathan J Cannon, late of said county, deceased. Sold under an order of the Ordinary of said county, for the benefit of the heirs and creditors. Terms, cash. N. W. ISLER, Adm'r of N. W. & N. J. Cannon. December 13, 1865

    Two months after date application will be made to the Court of the Ordinary of Wilkinson county, Ga., for leave to sell the lands belonging to the estate of Allen Davidson, late of said county, deceased, for the benefit of the heirs of said deceased. JOSEPH F. DAVIDSON, Adm'r of Allen Davidson, dec'd. December 12, 1865

  ~excerpts~ WILKINSON COURT OF ORDINARY. ...application has this day been made by Mary Arnett for letters of guardianship for the minor children of William K. Dixon, deceased....this Dec. 7th, 1865. E. F. HUGHES, Ex. Offi. Ord'y. December 1, 1865.

  ~excerpts~ Issac F. Johnson applies to me for letters of administration on the estate of I. L. Davis, late of said county, deceased-...this Dec'r 4th, 1865. E. F. HUGHES, Ex. Offi. Ord'y. December 12, 1865

~excerpts~ George H. C. Reed has applied to me for letters of administration on the estate of Daniel Burke, late of said county, deceased-...11th day of November, 1865...November 21, 1865

~excerpts~ Mary Helton to me for letters of administration on the estate of A. J. Helton, late of said county, deceased...this November 22d, 1865. November 28, 1865.

 ~excerpts..Martha A. Stubbs..made application for letters of administration on the estate of Robert L. Stubbs, late of said county, deceased...2d October 1865

~excerpts~ Isaac Johnson..letters of guardianship for the minor heirs of C. T. Johnson...October 2, 1865

~excerpts~ Behethland Porter and Thomas R. Porter ..letters of administration on the estate of Julius N. Porter, late of said county deceased...November 8th, 1865

Mrs. H. C. Murry...letters of administration on the estate of J.R. Murry, late of said county, deceased -...November 8, 1865

Caroline Hanks and O. H. P. Rawls ...letters of administration on the estate of Leroy Hanks, late of said county, deceased. ..8th day of November, 1865.

~excerpts~ leave to sell one-third interest in the lands belonging to the estate of William Pearce, late of said county, deceased. HENRIETTA PEARCE, Adm'x. S. J. STUBBS, Adm'r. November 14, 1865



1866
January 22, 1866
The Macon Daily Telegraph
A GOOD PRACTICAL COUNTRY
BOARDING SCHOOL
WILL open on the 22d of January, one mile and a half south of Gordon, Central Railroad, near my residence, a Boarding School. I have a house nearly completed, sufficient to accommodate 150 students, in arrangement inferior to none in the State. The situation is as healthy, and water as good as any in northern or middle Georgia. I will be assisted by wife, (who is a regular graduate) or other competent teachers. My object will not only be to teach the arts and sciences from books, but practically.. Not only to enlarge the mind and improve their understanding, but to impress the idea that when the students leave school that their education is only commenced, and to be successful in life they must improve their energy with their education, get up soon and go ahead. I have a large and comfortable dwelling with fireplaces in every room, and can board quite a number; besides board can be got with a number of first class families in the neighborhood.
Board per month half in advance.................................... $15
Tuition per mer of five months for all the English branches  15.
Music on Piano and use of Instrument............................... 25
The Languages................................................................. 25
For particulars, address
W. M. Whitehurst
Principal and Proprietor, Gordon, Ga.

May 7, 1866
Georgia Weekly Telegraph
MURDER NEAR GORDON - The many friends of Mr. Joseph Jones, the well known and obliging landlord of the Gordon Hotel, will be pained to hear that he was waylaid and murdered Sunday last. The only facts of the case that we have been able to gather are, that he rode out from home during the day, and his horse returning without him, his family became alarmed and dispatched a party in search of him. After proceeding a few miles they discovered blood and other traces in the sand which they followed up until they came to the body of Mr. Jones hurriedly buried beneath the dirt and leaves. An individual of the neighborhood, whose name we could not obtain, has been arrested for the murder, and at last accounts was undergoing examination.
    Mr. Jones leaves a large and interesting family to lament his bloody and untimely death.

May 7, 1866
Georgia Weekly Telegraph
The Gordon Murder. Gordon, Ga., May 1st, 1866.
    I desire, Mr. Editor, to correct some errors in my notice of the murder of our townsman, Josiah H. Jones, and to give you some of the facts in evidence.
   Our village was thrown into a fever of excitement on Saturday morning by the report that Mr. Jones was missing; his horse having returned home without him. He was last seen by some of the neighbors about ten o'clock at night, at which time he visited his steam mill, in the place, and while there, in the presence of his watchman, drew out his pistol and fired off one barrel of it. He then mounted his horse and rode off. Some twenty or thirty minutes thereafter, two pistol shots were herd and a woman's screams, but no notice was taken of it at the time. The next morning his family not finding him in  bed, and his returning without him, the citizens turned out "en masse" to search for him. Mr. Brantly, -an employee of Mr. Jones' - rode up to the house of Mrs. Sarah Mathis; (a tenant of Mr. Jones,) he having heard the pistol shots the night before. He called Mrs. Mathis out, and asked her if she had seen Mr. Jones the night before. She replied that she had not seen him since one o'clock Saturday: but her pale, haggard countenance and the violent trembling satisfied Mr. Brantly that Mr. Jones was dead, and that she was cognizant of it. A party was immediately sent to the house of Mrs. Mathis and a close search instituted. A large pool of clotted blood was discovered at the corner of the yard fence, covered over with a board and rails, and a trail was found as though some heavy body had been dragged through the leaves. The trail was followed and about one yards in front of the house a mound of earth was discovered which proved to be the grave of our unfortunate fellow-citizen. One shoulder and the til of his coat were visible. He was taken up and it was discovered that he had come to his death by a pistol ball. He was struck in the left eye, the ball ranging across the head diagonally and lodging against the skull, back of his right ear. The pistol must have been within ten or twelve inches of his face when fired, as his face was blackened by powder, and the wound was large enough to have admitted a small-sized hen egg.- Upon closer examination, a second wound was found upon the left shoulder, which was but a flesh wound.
  A negro woman testified that he was shot by Shadrach Croom, and the evidence was point blank in fixing upon him the charge of willful murder. Mrs. Mathis testified that Mr. Jones had shot first at Croom. She had buried the pistol of Mr. Jones, which was found with but one barrel discharged, and the evidence was satisfactory that  Jones had discharged that one at his will.
   The Negro woman swore that Croom had forced her to assist him in dragging off the body of Jones, and that Mrs. Mathis had taken her with her to turn loose Mr. Jones'  the result of a weak mind and the serious fright she had experienced.
  Mr., Jones was a man whose loss will be deeply deplored, for he was, during the war, and up to the time of his assassination, the practical friend to the poor, the widow and the orphan. He had, by his untiring energy, accumulated quite a large fortune which was almost entirely destroyed by Sherman's army. *****

July 4, 1866
Augusta Chronicle and Sentinel
A few days ago negroes murdered aMrs. Rollins of Wilkinson county, under revolting circumstances, and attempted to kill her children. We learn that a freed man named Pompey O'Bannon, who was one of the parties to the murder, was arrested and taken in charge by the citizens who burned him at the stake. A reward of $500 is offered for a man named William, his associate in the crime, who was closely pursed, and shot in the face, but made his escape. Most of those who witnessed the fate of O'Bannon were negroes and they concurred in the opinion that he deserved his terrible fate.

July 9, 1866
Georgia Weekly Telegraph
$500 REWARD
Is offered by James Stevens and John D. Rollins, to any person white or black, for the apprehension and delivery of a negro man by the name of William -------, to either of us, or lodged in the jail at Macon, Ga. so that either of us can get him.
  Said negro committed a most brutal and atrocious murder upon the person of Mrs. Louisa Rollins, wife of one of the undersigned, in the County of Wilkinson, near Station No. 15, on the Central Railroad, by knocking her on the head with a club, until life was extinct. He also attempted to murder Mrs. Rollins' little girl, about three years of age; also a servant girl in the house. The negro's intention was robbery of the premises, and this murder was committed to conceal his crime.
   Description.--William, sometimes calling himself Dennis, is very tall, heavily built, will weigh some 210 to 220 pounds, very large feet, in walking one foot turns out more than the other, middle toe longer than the others, sufficient to attract attention, and rises on the big and third toe, on one or both feet so as to make a peculiar track when walking barefooted, skin quite black, and is rather a young man. His accomplice says he has a small sore on the top of his head and some white hairs on the back of his head. He also says that William or Dennis is a notorious robber and murderer, having committed many robberies around Atlanta and Chattanooga. He is also supposed, from information from his accomplice, and other sources to be the murderer of Col. Cruise, for whom, we understand, there is a reward of $1,000 now offered. He has changed his dress once or more since the murder of Mrs. Rollins. Was in Macon when last authentically heard from. He says he has lived in Savannah, and is acquainted in Atlanta and Chattanooga, . JAMES STEVENS, JOHN D. ROLLINS, Toomsboro, No. 15, C.R.R.

July 24, 1866
Federal Union
DEATH OF OLD CITIZENS - Judge J. S. Thomas and Dr. J. S. Whitten of Hancock, and Col. Green B. Burney, of Wilkinson, died a few days ago. These were all old, intelligent and respectable citizens.
.
July 27, 1866
Augusta Chronicle and Sentinel
The Columbus Enquirer, says that a Negro, recently arrested in the city for stealing, is believed to be William who murdered Mrs. Rollins in Wilkinson County. He answers the description fully even to the little marks on his person.

July 31, 1866
Augusta Chronicle and Sentinel
The negro arrested for the murder of Mrs. Rollins, in Wilkinson county, is believed to be one of the party who killed Mr. James R. Crew, of Atlanta, last fall. Governor Jenkins has directed him to be held in prison in Columbus, to protect him against violence if taken to the county where Mrs. R. was murdered.

October 2, 1866
Southern Recorder
~excerpt~ Georgia, Wilkinson County...sold at Irwinton..first Tuesday in November next...
    Three hundred acres of land, more or less, being  lots No. 211 and 212 in the 26th District of said county, excepting and reserving one hundred acres more or less..land of Sarah Ward, the same being the place where James Ward lived at the time of his death; one hundred acres more or less being well improved with good fence..adjoining lands of the estate of James H. Fountain, John Taylor, Nat Myrick and others..distribution among the heirs at law of James Ward, deceased. John McArthur, Ex;r. Sept. 11, 1866

.....will be sold at Irwinton...first Tuesday in November next, the plantation known as the Martin Carswell place containing one thousand acres, more or less, lying in the twenty-third District of said county, with the exception of one lot 2021/2 acres lying in the county of Twiggs; but all originally are said twenty-third District of said county; the same being the place whereon Samuel M. Carswell resided at the time of his death, and being also the dower lands of Jane M. Carswell, late of said county, deceased.
   There is on the place a good comfortable two story dwelling house with eight rooms, a gin-house and cotton screw and all the necessary fixtures and out house for plantation use, in good repair; between five and six hundred acres of said land in  cultivation and well improved-fine orchard &c.
   Sold as the property of Samuel M. Carswell, deceased, for distribution among the heirs at law. M. J. Carswell, Adm'r. Sept. 11, 1866.

  ..sold..about ten one acres lots of land, also two or more acres on which there is a comfortable dwelling and out houses; also about one hundred and seventy aces of land lying contiguous to the above, all in the third District of said county, and on the Central Railroad at Toombsboro' adjoining lands to Deese, Kingry and Joel Coney - sold as the property of Mrs. Rebecca Garratt, deceased, for the benefits of the heirs and creditors..Calvin Deans, Adm'r. Sept 11, 1866.

     Will be sold...one lot of land lying in the 4th district of said county; No. not known, but the place whereon Milly Pearce lived and died and where James Langford now resides..property of Daniel S. Pearce, deceased. Wiley Holland,  Adm'r de bonis non. Sept 11, 1866

    ..following parcels of land, to-wit:
   Lots of land, Nos. 232, 233, 234, 235, 236, 161, 186, 205 and 208, each containing 202 1/2 acres, more or less; 165 acres of lot 210, North-west half of lot 237, 50 acres of lot 178, 59 1/2  of lot 185' all the above described lands lying in the 26th district of said county;
also lot No. 90, containing 202 1/2 acres more or less, and 170 acres of lot No. 109, both in the 5th district of said county...the above described lands .embrace the plantation whereon the late James H. Fountain formerly lived-one thousand acres, more or less, being well improved, with good building, out-house, stables, &c.
   Sold as the property of James H. Fountain, deceased, ....distribution among the heirs..R. E. Hatfield, Adm'r. July 31, 1866.

    Executors Sale..the interest of Wyatt Meredith, deceased, in lot of land, No. 128, containing 202 1/2 acres; part of lot No. 125, containing 90 acres; part of lot No 124, containing 44 3/4 acres; part of lot No. 157, containing 40 acres; and two acres in north-west corner of lot No. 125, the same being one-half interest. ...Willis Allen, Ex'r. August 14, 1866.

Adminstrator's Sale...first Tuesday in November next, the lands belonging to the estate of Charles E. Nesmith, late of said county, deceased. E. F. Hughs, Adm'r. September 4, 1866

  ..D. Solomon applies for letters of dismission from the administration of the estate of W. J. Solomon, late of said county, deceased....April 7th, 1877. F. Chambers, Ordinary. April 17, 1866.

  ...Isaac F. Johnson, administrator of Sarah L. Rains...fully administered her estate..26th August 18, 1866 F. Chambers, Ord'y. September 4, 1866

  ...Joseph B. Payne applies to me for letters of guardianship of the persons and property of the minors of David Cannon, deceased....August 26, 1866. F. Chambers, Ord'y. September 4th, 1866.

    ...Whereas Phillip F. Payne applies for letters of adminstration on the estate of David Cannon, late of said county, deceased...August 26th, 1866. F. Chambers, Ord'y. September 4, 1866.

  ...Claborn B. Sanders of the State of Texas and Sarah Colson of the State of Florida..appointment of freeholders to divide the land belonging to estate of
Thos.Holder, late of said county, deceased...John Holder, Adm'r. Sept. 11, 1866.

  ...Winneford Robertson, Adm'x, de bonis non, of O. T. Robertson, deceased, applies for letters of dismission from administration of said estate...Sept. 4, 1866
. F. Chambers, Ord'y. Sept. 11, 1866.

....John Vanlandingham and S. F. Salter apply to me for letters of administration on the estate of Penelope Vanlandingham, late of said county, deceased..September 18th, 1866. F. Chambers, Ord'y. Setember 26, 1866

  ...leave to sell the real estate of W. O. Beall, deceased. T. N. Beall, Ex'r. August 7, 1866.

  ...leave to sell the real esate of Samuel Beall, deceased. T. N. Beall, Adm'r. August 7, 1866.

...leave to sell the real estate of Burrel Holder, dec'd, also his interest in 57 3.4 acres land, the same being one third. Littleton Branan, Adm'r. August 14th, 1866.

....indebted to the estate of William C. Lee, late of Wilkinson county, dec'd...2nd July 1866. W. T. Fountain, Adm'r. August 14th, 1866.

...leave to sell the real estate of Ransome Payne, Jr., late of said county, deceased. E. J. Gilbert, Adm'r. August 28, 1866.

....leave to sell the lease of F. A. Kittles, dec'd on part of lot in Wilkinson county, No. 249, contaning one hundred acres; also leave to sell two lots of land in Dooly county, Nos. 175 & 176 belonging to said dec'd. Braswell Wynn, Adm'r. August 21, 1866

..leave to sell the interest in the land belonging to the estate of William S. Sutton, deceased - the same being fifty acres. Rosey A. Sutton, Adm'r. September 4, 1866.

...indebted to the estates of Moses B. Price and William S. Sutton, deceased are notified to make immediate payment...Rosey A. Sutton, Adm'x. September 4, 1866.

        Guardian's Sale ..forty-one and one third acres of land belonging to the minor heirs of Wm. Etheridge, deceased. Jane M. Spence, Guardian. Sept. 11, 1866

            ....will be sold..real estate of John Sanders, deceased. Sold for the benefit of heirs and creditors. King Sanders, Adm'r. Sept. 11, 1866

  will be sold...fourteen hundred acres of land, more or less, (except the widow's dower,) numbers not now recollected, but adjoining land of A. R. Brundage, V. W. Tharpe and others, immediately on the C. R. R., about midway from No. 16 and No. 17, a first rate locality for planting, milling or shipping purposed...will be show by John McArthur, near the place. Sold for the benefit of the heirs and creditors...Sarah A. Lewis, Adm'x. September 18, 1866.
 

October 11, 1866
Daily Columbus Enquirer
   At the late term of the Superior Court of Wilkinson county, - Crooms was tried for killingJ. H. Jones, of Gordon, and found guilty of murder, but on the jury's recommendation to mercy, was sentenced to confinement in the penitentiary for life.

November 8, 1866
Chronicle and Sentinel
The Macon Telegraph says: The sentence of death was executed upon the negro Bill, the murderer of Mrs. Rollins, at Irwinton, Friday last, in the presence of an immense throng of spectators. We learn that he made full confession of the horrid crime, together with a life devoted to robbery and murder. The Atlanta ticket agent fell at his hands, and numbers were sent unprepared to their last account by this demon in human form. His confession has been written out, and will be given to the public.

November 11, 1866
Georgia Weekly Telegraph
Administrator's Sale
On the first Tuesday in December next, will be sold before the Court House door in Irwinton, Wilkinson county, Georgia, within the usual hours of sale, all the lands belonging to the estate of Josiah H. Jones, lying in said county (except the widow's dower), as follows:
  One lot in Gordon, known as the J. D. Williams lot; one house and lot known as the J.R. Kelly lot; one lot adjoining the hotel lot and Major Kelly's lot, with a two-story framed building neatly finished; several other building lots on each side of the Railroad at Gordon; also, the tract of land known as the Gordon tract, containing seventeen hundred (1700) acres, more or less, on which are situated the hotel and outbuildings; also, a steam saw mill in good repair and fine running order -boilers and everything complete-with a new planing machine attached, blacksmith shops, wood shops and houses for hands, right on the Central Railroad, Station No. 17. Said tract lines on both sides of the C.R.R. and M. & G. R. R. with an inexhaustible amount of saw-logs, crossties and cord wood timber. Also, one hundred acres of lot No. 170, in 27th district; five acres of lot No. 15, in 4th district; one hundred and twenty-two acres of lot No. 15, in 4th district; eighty acres lying between J. W. Branan and William McDowell's land, number not known; twenty-five acres lot No. 16, in 4th district. The best investment in the State.
  Sold as the property of said J. H. Jones, deceased, for the benefit of the heirs and creditors. Terms on the day.
James L. Branan, Administrator
Gordon, C.R.R., Oct. 23, 1866.

November 21, 1866
Chronicle and Sentinel
The Federal Union learns that the negro Bill, taken from the jail of that city to Wilkinson county for trial, and guilty of the murder of Mrs. Rollins and sent to the Penitentiary for confinement before execution, confesses that he killed Mr. Crews, of Atlanta, some time ago, and about which murder there was a great mystery. Bill says he has been killing and robbing ever since he was sixteen years of age. His full confessions (says the Union) would make a rare sensational sale book for the news boys.


1867
January 8, 1867
Federal Union
MARRIED, On the 27th of December, 1866, by Rev. J. B. Wardlaw, Mr. SEABORN FOUNTAIN, of Wilkinson county, and Miss MAGGIE IRVINE of Cuthbert, Ga.

March 5, 1867
Southern Recorder
~excerpts~ Wilkinson Sheriff Sale - ...first Tuesday, in April next,..one house and lot in the town of Gordon, being one-half acres, more or less, levied on as the property of Sarah J. Bagley and John R. Bagley, by virtue of a fi fa issued from the County Court, James Balkum vs. said Sarah. J. Bagley and John R. Bagley...NELSON STUCKEY, D. Sh'ff. February 26, 1867

WILKINSON SHERIFF SALE - Will be sold before the Court-house door in the town of Irwinon, on the first Tuesday in April next, within the legal hours of sale, one dark bay mare Mule; levied on as the property of Jesse Fountain, (Freedman) by virtue of a mortgate fi fa, Peter roach vs said Fountain. Property pointed out in said morgage. NELSON STUCKEY,D. Sh'ff. January 29, 1867.

WILKINSON SHERIFF SALE.  - Will be sold before the Court-house door in the town of Irwinton, on the first Tuesday in April next, within the legal hours of sale, one lot of land in the town of Irwinton, containing one acre, more or less, known as the Taylor and Masonic lot, adjoining Read, Chambers, Hughs, and others; levied on as the property of Jonathan Rivers and others; W. C. Parker vs. said Jonathan Rivers and others; property pointed out by plaintiff's attorney. NELSON STUCKEY, D. Sh'ff.  February 12, 1867

EXECUTOR'S SALE - By virtue of an order from the Court of Ordinary of Wilkinson county, will be sold before the Court-house door in Irwinton, on the first Tuesday in April next, within the legal hours of sale, 158 acres of land, more or less, belonging to the estate of John G. R. Hogan, late of said county, deceased, lying in the 3d district of said county; part of lot No. 20, and part of a lot, number not known, but adjoining lands of J. W. Ussery, T. R. Porter and others. Sold for the benefit of the heirs and creditors of said deceased.
  Terms, one-third cash, small notes and two good securities, due March 1st, 1868, for the other two-thirds. ERASMUS BULLOCK, Ex'r. February 19, 1867

~excerpt~ GEORGIA, WILKINSON COUNTY
  Whereas Elbert Fowler applies to me for letters of dismission from the administration of the estate of John Fowler, late of said county, dec'd.....
7th day of January, 1867. F. CHAMBERS, Ordinary. January 15, 1867.

   GEORGIA, WILKINSON COUNTY. Whereas Jas. R. Billew, Administrator of Franklin J. and Richmond S. Sutton represents to the Court in his petition that he has fully administered Franklin J. and Richmond S. Sutton's estates-...discharged
from his administration....Dec. 13th, 1866. F. CHAMBERS, Ordinary. December 25, 1866.

GEORGIA, WILKINSON COUNTY. Whereas Joseph F.  Davidson applies to me for letters of dismission from the estate of
Allen Davidson, late of said county deceased....November 5th, 1866. F. CHAMBERS, Ord'y. November 13, 1866

GEORGIA WILKINSON COUNTY,
   Whereas Isaac F. Johnson, administrator of Sarah L. Rains, represents in his petition to the court, which is duly filed and recorded, that he has full administered said Sarah L. Rains' estate...letters of dismission 26th August 1866. ..F. CHAMBERS, Ord'y. September 4, 1866.

GEORGIA, WILKINSON COUNTY
   Whereas, Winneford Robertson, Adm'x, de bonis non, of O. T. Robertson, deceased, applies for letters of dismission from administration of said estate- ...Sept. 4, 166. F. CHAMBERS, Ord'y. Sept. 11, 1866

SIXTY DAYS after date application will be made to the Ordinary of Wilkinson county for leave to sell the land of Henry Bloodworth, deceased, reserving dower. ISABELLA BLOODWORTH, Adm
x. February 12, 1867.

SIXTY DAYS after date application will be made to the Ordinary of Wilkinson county for leave to sell the real estate of Francis Whipple, deceased. S B WHIPPLE,  Adm'r. February 12, 1867.

SIXTY DAYS after date application will be made to the Ordinary of Wilkinson county for leave to sell the real estate ofJ. K. Holder, deceased. LOVE HEARNDON Adm't  February 12, 1867.

SIXTY DAYS after date application will be made to the Ordinary of Wilkinson county for leave to sell all the lands belonging to the estate of W. J. Garrett, late of said county, dec'd.. J. W. EVANS, Adm'r. January 29, 1867.

SIXTY DAYS after date application will be made to the Ordinary of Wilkinson county for leave to sell all the lands belonging to the estate of George W. Garrett, late of said county. deceased, reserving dower. EPSY MURKISON, Adm'r.  January 29, 1867.

 ~extract~ all persons indebted to the estate of Thomas Parker, late of Wilkinson county, deceased, are hereby notified to come forward and settle, and those having demands to present them in terms of the law. R. N. PARKER, Adm'r. January 15, 1867

GEORGIA, WILKINSON COUNTY.
`excerpts~ Whereas James Pittman applies to me for letters of dismission from the administration of the estate of Jesse B. Pittman, deceased- ...February 5th, 1867. F. CHAMBERS, Ordinary. February 12, 1867.

August 27, 1867
Federal Union
HOMICIDE - A negro man by the name of Alfred Bell whipped his wife to death Saturday night, (17th inst.) in the vicinity of Gordon. Such was the coroner's verdict. The negro has since confessed to the crime, and is now lodged in Irwinton jail, awaiting trial.

September 6, 1867
Southern Christian Advocate
John Freeman was born in Scriven county, Ga., March 30th 1796, and died 6th of August, aged 71 years. He came to Wilkinson county, Ga., in 1818, and was married to Miss Cauly in 1822. He leaves a wife and several children and grandchildren. N. D. Morehouse. (buried Freeman Family Cemetery)

 September 6, 1867
Southern Christian Advocate
Mary Z. E. Freeman was born in Wilkinson co,. Ga., July 22d, 1852, and died 5th August. Wm. H. Freeman also died 5th August, aged 17 years. N. D. Morehouse. (buried Freeman Family Cemetery)

September 20, 1867
Georgia Weekly Telegraph
   Died, in Gordon, Ga., September 9th, at the residence of her brother-in-law, Sallie A. Jones, aged 17 years.
     But a few days ago she was with us in the morning of life, in the spring-time of youth, but like an early spring flower, she was nipped by the icy hand of death. How difficult to realize that the echoes of her silver laugh shall be heard no more; that the sound of her nimble feet is hushed forever in the marble stillness of the tomb! Happy, joyous creature, if affection could have kept thee, thou hadst not died.
  "The life has gone, the breath has fled,
And what has been no more shale be;
The well know form, the welcome tread,
Oh! where are they, and where is she?"
L.K.

September 27, 1867
Macon Weekly Telegraph
-extract~Jessie Imogea Reed, daughter of Dr. and Mrs G. H.. C. Reed, was born December 9th, 1863 and died, at the residence of her uncle, R.F. Rozar, in Wilkinson county, Georgia, after suffering with congestive fever for only three days, on the 16th day of  September, 1867.

October 4, 1867
Southern Christian Advocate
Mrs. Charlotte Veal, wife of William Veal, Sen., of Wilkinson co., Ga., was born in Washington co., Ga., December 25th 1796, and died Sept. 25, 1867. She was married to Mr. Veal in 1812, who settled in Twiggs co., Ga., the following year-- in 1846, moved to Wilkinson. She left an aged husband and three children.

November 8, 1867
Macon Weekly Telegraph
Married, in Wilkinson county, October 22d, at the residence of the bride's father, Mr. James Jackson, by Rev. E.J. Coats, James McCallum, of Twiggs county, and Miss Nanie B. Jackson.

November 8, 1867
Georgia Weekly Telegraph
Sale for Distribution
By Virtue Of A Decree From The Superior Court of Wilkinson county, will be sold at the Court-house door, in the town of Irwinton, on the first Tuesday in January next, seven hundred (700) acres of Land, more or less about three hundred acres of said land is cleared, and said land lies about four miles west of Irwinton and about three miles from the Central Railroad. Well timbered, and healthy: known as the Meadows' place. Sold as the property of Joel Butler, late deceased, in said county. Sold for distribution. Terms, cash. G. W. Butler, Executor.

November 11, 1867
Georgia Weekly Telegraph
Commissioner's Sale.
James Jackson vs. Joel Deese, James Bloodworth and Epsey Murkinson, Adm'x, of Benjamin F. Murkinson, dec'd.
By virtue of an order of the Superior Court of Wilkinson County, in the above stated case, will be sold before the Court House door in the town of Irwinton, in said county, on the FIRST TUESDAY  in November next, within the legal hours of sale: A valuable set of Mills on Commissioners' creek, in said county, within a couple of hundred yards of Toombsboro, at Station No. 15, Central Railroad, and within six miles of Irwinton known as the Deese and Jackson Mills, with one hundred acres of land, more  or less, attached, the metes and bounds of which are not known, but it includes all the land connected with what is known as the Deese and Jackson Mill Tract, and used for yards, pond, dam, etc. Sold for a partition between the parties.
Terms of sale, cash.
James C. Bower, Franklin Chambers, Joel T. Coney. Com'rs.

November 13, 1867
The Columbus Enquirer
Details of the Gordon Homicide- We have learned since our yesterday's issue most of the particulars of the sad affair at Gordon, Friday evening, which resulted so fatally to one of the parties, Mr.Mongtomery Lampee, and seriously to the other, Mr. John Towler.
  some two weeks ago, Mr. Towler, a fireman on the Central Railroad, was taking dinner at the hotel in Gordon, and at the same table with him were seated mr. Lampee and Mr. Fulsom, who were engaged in conversation, in which Lampee remarked something about having made a nice profit in a cotton trade, Towler, who was an old army comrade of Lampee's, remarked, in a jesting way, that he was "blowing," at which Lampee became highly incensed, and made some harsh reply. Towler, who saw that he was offended, then endeavored to explain that he meant no offense; but finding apology useless, told him the table was not the place to settle it. Dinner over, Towler apologized again, when Lampee asked him if he was armed, and ordered him to step of ten paces. Towler, seeing then that Lampee intended shooting him, got behind a tree and endeavored to escape from him by getting the hotel building between them. Lapee fired at him as he was passing between the hotel and the kitchen, but without effect. Towler succeeded in escaping to his engine. On the next trip down some words passed between them, which served to aggravate the ill feeling already existing.
  After this nothing occurred until Friday last, when, as Towler was coming out of the hotel, Lampee met him and accused him of having mistreated him, to which Towler replied with a similar charge, whereupon he struck Towler in the face with his open hand, drawing the blood, pushed him down the steps to the gate, and drawing his knife, threatened him. Towler then jerked loose and drew his pistol, when Lampee went back in the house for his. Towler then made for the woodsrack on the side of the railroad, and then was just getting behind it when Lampee fired, the ball entering Towler's left leg just above the knee. Towler then drew his pistol, and when Lampee was within thirty steps, fired, the ball entering his right eye, and killing him instantly.
  Mr. Towler is not under arrest as reported, but holds himself ready to answer any charge that may be brought against him. He came to Macon to receive medical attention. - Jour. & Mess.

November 29, 1867
Southern Christian Advocate
Married. By Rev. W. S. Baker, October 24, 1867, Capt. A. A. Beall to MissMattie J. Hughes, all of Irwinton, Ga.

November 29, 1867
Southern Christian Advocate
Married. By the same, October 31st at the residence of Mr. James Pierce, Esq., Mr. Jethro D. Vanlandingham to Miss Cyntha Pierce, all of Wilkinson county.

December 3, 1867
Southern Recorder
~excerpt~ Guardian's Sale..first Tuesday in January next..33½ acres of land belonging to the minor orphans of J. C. Webb, deceased, adjoining lands of Ira Deese and the estate of William Garrett,and within a half mile of Toombsboro', (NO. 15, C.R.R.) known as the Jesse C. Webb Place. Terms cash. JAMES LORD, Guardian. November 12, 1867.

~excerpt~ Administrator's Sale..first Tuesday in January next.....166½ acres of land, more or less, it being part of lots Nos. 283 and 284, in the 2d district of Wilkinson county, belonging to the estate of Obadiah Wynn, deceased. Terms Cash. JOHN E DUNCAN, Adm'r. Nov. 12, 1867.

~excerpt~ Administrator's Sale..first Tuesday in January next....135½ acres of land, more or less, being parts of lots Nos. 271 and 256, in the 23d district of Wilkinson county, belonging to the estate of Joseph A. J. Carr, dec'd. Sold for the benefit of creditors. Terms cash. E. J. GILBERT, Adm'r. November 12, 1867.

~excerpt~MARY E NIX, vs. R. A. NIX
SARAH DIXON, vs. ALEX. DIXON
 LIBEL FOR DIVORCE In Wilkinson Superior Court, October Term, 1867
..defendants in the above stated cases, are not to be found in the county, and that they do not reside in the State.
...Minutes of said Court, this 20th November, 1867. GEO. W. TARPLEY,  Clerk, November 26, 1867.



1868
January 7, 1868
Federal Union
DEATH OF AN OLD INHABITANT. Mrs. Fountain, for many years a resident of this city, who had for some time past been living in Wilkinson county, died last week at her plantation, near Gordon, at the advanced age of ninety-nine years and five months. -Sav. Advertiser.

January 10, 1868
Southern Christian Advocate
In Irwinton, Ga., by Rev. W. F. Robison, on 18th Dec., Mr. M. J. Guyton of Laurens co. and Miss Cornelia Fisher, of the former place.

January 31, 1868
Macon Weekly Telegraph
CHAMBERS -HUGHES - Married, on the morning of the 9th inst., at the residence of the brides' father, at Jeffersonville, by Rev. E. J. Coates, Mr. Franklin Chambers, of Irwinton, to Miss Maria Hughes, of the former place.

January 31, 1868
Macon Weekly Telegraph
OBITUARY.     Died, near Irwinton, Wilkinson county, Ga,  Jan 11, 1868, of Dyspeptic Consumption, Thomas P. Carnes, of this city, in the 28th year of his age.

February 7, 1868
Georgia Weekly Telegraph
Notice to Debtors and Creditors. All persons having claims against John Freeman, deceased, late of Wilkinson county, Ga., will render them in to us within the time prescribed by law. Those indebted to the same will please settle forthwith.
J. M. Freeman, T. M. Freeman, Administrators John Freeman, decd.

February 18, 1868
Federal Union
Capt. N. A. Carswell, a prominent member of the Bar of Wilkinson county, died at his residence in Irwinton a short time since. Capt. C. commanded a Company in the 3d Ga. Regt., and, we think, contracted in camp the disease which terminated his life. At the commencement of the war he was a young man of great promise.

 April 24, 1868
Southern Christian Advocate
Married. By Rev. W. Lane, on 5th April, 1868, Mr. W. A. Hall to MissPermelia Vanlandingham, both of Wilkinson co., Ga.

May 15, 1868
Southern Christian Advocate
Mrs. Francis Harvill, daughter of Wm. and Elizabeth Vanlandingham, was born Dec. 1, 1834, and died in Wilkinson co., Ga., April 29, 1868. W. Lane

May 22, 1868
Georgia Weekly Telegraph
The Excitement in Wilkinson.
Messers. Editors: To prevent misunderstanding and misrepresentation, permit me, through your columns, to make a brief statement of facts, as given by eye witnesses and other person familiar with the affair which has taken place recently in Wilkinson county, between J. F. Burney and some of the freedmen on his farm.
  Mr. Burney and the hands, under a contract, agreed that the freedmen should have possession of some mules, keeping them at their homes as long as the mules were treated well. If mistreated or used at night or on Sundays, or for other purpose than cultivating the crop, Mr. Burney was to resume possession of them.
    According to this contract, Mr. Burney being satisfied that the mules were mistreated, demanded possession of them. The freedmen resisted, and, with arms and clubs in their hands, surrounded the dwelling of Mr. Burney on Sunday morning last, in a large body, and so conducted themselves as to inspire alarm and threaten riot.
  Mr. Burney sent for officers and assistance to arrest the parties and recover the mules under a possessory warrant. The deputy Sheriff and his son repair to the scene of action and proceeded to make arrests, but were resisted and fired upon by one of the freemen, with a long range pistol. The deputy returned the fire once, with a squirrel or bird load, which inflicted but a trifling wound. The fire of the freedman took no effect.
  The freedmen then surrendered and were committed to jail (as the writer supposes) for the offense of resisting the officers. It is believed these are all the material facts and every thing is now quiet. Observer.

July 24, 1868
Georgia Weekly Telegraph
Wilkinson Colored Conservative Club
Editors Telegraph: With pleasure we announce to the public, through your widely circulated medium, the organization of this Colored Club. On the night of the 17th instant, at the Court-house in Irwinton, the colored Conservatives met, and called Joseph Stoakes, Esq., (colored) to the Chair, and Isaac Smith to act as Secretary.
  The object of the meeting was explained by the President in a clear and precise style. We are proud to say the President delivered an able speech in his great, new cause. His tones of truth sounded success to every ear. Uncle Joe is decidedly a host when he starts.
  After his speech closed, the Rev. Mr. John Dupree, colored, was called upon to give his views on the political topics of the day. For one hour not a noise was heard, save the loud applause's, at intervals, of his audience. One common, fixed attention was given by all to his strong, able and intelligent speech.
  He said he voted the Radical ticket, and voted it without knowing for what. After voting for these Northern refuse and Southern demagogues, he was frowned upon by those for whom he voted-strangers, in fact, and all seemed after money-and he was compelled to return to his home with a Southern white to get his living. He said he was born in Georgia, and in Georgia's proud clime he willed to die and moulder in the dust-to have his soul, after "a good fight," gently wafted on high by the glorious conservative breeze of Georgia. He warned his colored friends of the evil course they, of late, had pursued, and begged them to not look behind, but fix their aim upon things that are valuable. To listen not to men moved only by self-interest, which showed itself so plainly.
  He said the Radical party used the poor ignorant colored men for their vile purposes, and then they were obliged to get a home with white men to live.
  In closing his effective speech, he said: "My friends, I am much pleased with the Conservative nominees for President and Vice-President. They are the very men to guide us on. We have been long enough in the dark, and now let us all 'Seymour' while everything around should 'Blair' up in our eye."
  By order of the President, the next meeting is on Monday night next. Mr. Dupree was unanimously elected to be delegate for Wilkinson county to any meeting of a political nature which might need his attention in Wilkinson, Twiggs or Jones. Mr. Dupree is, indeed, an able speaker. Irwinton

August 7, 1868
Southern Christian Advocate
Married. By Rev. W. Lane, July 19, 1868, Mr. Luther A. Hall to Miss Anna G. Boatright, both of Irwinton, Ga.

August 14, 1868
Southern Christian Advocate
Married. On 23d July, at the residence of J. H. Freeman, by Rev. W., F. Roberts, Mr. I. L. Davis to Miss Meriam Freeman, all of Wilkinson co., Ga.

August 18, 1868
Southern Recorder
   ~excerpt~ Died at Myrtle Spring place, in Wilkinson county, July 30th, 1868, of congestive chills, Mrs. MOLLIE J. HUGHES, consort of Charles H. Hughes and daughter of A. J. and M. A. Wilkinson.
 

September 4, 1868
Southern Christian Advocate
Willis Bulloch was born about the year 1800 and died in Wilkinson co., Ga., Aug. 5, 1868. W. Lane.

September 4, 1868
Macon Weekly Telegraph
Murder in Wilkinson
  Messrs. Editors:  The citizens of this town while engaged in devotional exercises on Wednesday night last, were disturbed by the firing of a pistol, which, upon examination proved to have ben fired at a freedman by the name ofJohn Fleetwood, who has recently assumed a prominent position in Radical politics in this county. The shot took effect in the neck of Fleetwood and he survived only a few hours.
   A short time since a Captain Young was sent to this town to look after the interest of the freedmen, etc. He procured a boarding-house and an office; hoisted the United States flag and invited the negroes to come under its folds. They obeyed the call and the office of Captain Young became their rendezvous.
  It is well-known fact that it is a part and parcel of the Radical electioneering plant to stir up strife among the races to make it appear that the Southern States are still rebellious. Well, on the night in question, a negro was procured to swear that Mr. Charles E. Frasuer, a young gentleman of irreproachable character, brave and generous to a fault, did the shooting. He (Frasuer) was arrested and is now in custody, pending trial, which commenced on Friday last.- Captain Cumming,
J. D. Jones, Esq., and Judge Chambers, have defended the prisoner and developed the trick of the Radicals. They have impeached Young and his negro as witnesses and made the blow which was intended for Seymour rebound on Grant Democracy all right. T.
  P. S. Will give you the finale of the investigation next week.

November 27, 1868
Georgia Weekly Telegraph
Administrators' Sale.
Agreeable to an order from the Ordinary of Wilkinson county, State of Georgia, will be sold before the Court-house door in Irwinton, in said county, between the legal hours of sale, on the first Tuesday in January next, lot of land No. 98, in the 25th district of Gilmer county, in said State, containing 160 acres. Sold as the property of the estate of John Freeman, Sr., deceased, late of Wilkinson county. Terms cash. T. W. Freeman, J. M. Freeman, Administrators



1869

January 8, 1869
Georgia Weekly Telegraph
FOR RENT
I will rent, to the highest bidder, on the 15th day of January 1869, at 11 o'clock, A.M., before the Court-house door, in the town of Irwinton, Wilkinson county, Ga., a fine Plantation on the Central Railroad, about nine miles from Irwinton, in Wilkinson county, containing about 750 acres, a large portion in cultivation, improvements, etc. Said Plantation is known as the McIntire Place, formerly the property of Dr. William Taylor, in bankruptcy, now in possession of Leroy Fleetwood, Esq.

FOR SALE - At the same time and place, will be sold at public Auction  a Lot of 3½ acres of Land, lying on the south side of the Central Railroad, in Wilkinson county, Ga., adjoining land of S. J. Nelson. Also, the interest of S. J. Nelson, in his mother's estate.
   The same sold under a Decree in Bankruptcy, as the property of Seaborn J. Nelson, bankrupt, for the benefit of his creditors. Joseph E. Murray, Assignee, etc.

January 15, 1869
Macon Weekly Telegraph
OBITUARY
Mrs Lucinda Wright, of Wilkinson county, is no more. She is gone the way of the living-to the grave.
  Sister Wright, prior to her marriage, was a Watkins. She was born in Hancock county, Ga., in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and seven, July 15th. In 1822 she was married to Mr. Simeon Gray. Mr. Gray died about the year 1833-'34. In 1835, she was married to Brother John Wright, with whom she lived until Bro. Wright died. (The author does not recollect precise date of Brother Wright's death, but along some time about 1855 or '56.) Since then she has lived a widow up to the time of her death, which occurred the 11th of December last, twenty-five minutes after eleven P.M.
  Sister Wright was a kind and affectionate wife-economical and saving, yet kind and charitable. With Bro. Wright, and since his death, she has accumulated a handsome property. She was a kind neighbor, and a good mistress u to the time slaves were set free, and although she lost much then, yet she has much to leave to her surviving kindred. She was a great as wife, as a neighbor, as a mistress, as a patriot, for she contributed much to the needy during the hard struggle through which we have recently passed (the war.) But she was great as a Christian. Sister Wright joined the Baptist Church in the year 1834. Since that time she has lived a Christian life. As a Christian, she was charitable and kind, and although the subject of much and severe affliction, she seemed to be resigned to the hand of a kind Providence. In  last illness, she gave the strongest evidence of her peace with her heavenly Father, through the blood of her beloved Savior.
  She has left numerous friends to mourn her loss yet they have the blessed hope that she is at rest, free from care and sorrow; and no doubt if she could speak from her sleeping tomb to-day she would say weep not for me.
The body sleeps in calm repose.
Wherein sin shall ne'er disturb it more:
The spirit's gone to God who gave it,
There to praise Him for redeeming grace and love.
A Friend
(Buried Providence Baptist Church)

February 19, 1869
Georgia Weekly Telegraph
~extract
"LAND FOR SALE
Will be sold before the Court-house door in the town of Irwinton, Wilkinson county, on the first Tuesday in March next, within the usual hours of sale, the following lots of wild, uncultivated land to-wit:"
(mentions land in Dooly County, Appling, now Ware, Irwin county, Early, now Decatur, Cherokee county. )
"Sold under an order of the Ordinary of Wilkinson county, as the property of A. C. Brown, deceased, for the benefits of the creditors. Sales to continue from day to day till all is sold. B. A. WHIPPLE, Administrator. Terms Case. January 9th 1869. "

February 19, 1869
Southern Christian Advocate
Married. On Dec. 23, 1868 by Rev. W. F. Roberts, Mr. H. H. Bailey to Miss Sallie Robertson.
By the same Dec. 27th 1868, Mr. J. L. Wynn to Miss Amanda Howel, all of Wilkinson co., Ga.
By the same, Feb. 2, 1869, Mr. Lewis Metts of Laurens co., Ga., to Miss Rachel A. Fordham, of Wilkinson co., Ga.

March 17, 1869
Columbus Enquirer
The names of the gentlemen who arrived in this city on Saturday last from Honduras, are H. E. and R. G. Hyman, and, before their emigration, they lived at McIntyre Station, on the Central Railroad, sixteen miles from the city. About two years ago they sold all their property, converted the proceeds into gold, and left for Hondurus, to make, in a few years, an independent fortune, as they sincerely believed. It was a sad mistake on their part; for, after two years of toil and trouble, in which they expended their all, they return to their old Georgia home, almost penniless, but with grateful hearts that they are permitted to see again the old friends and companions of youth, and rest for a season upon the dear old soil that gave them being. The trip, as they say, has learned them a lesson they will never forget. We welcome them back, and hope that by industry and rigid economy they may soon find themselves again on their pecualary pegs and prosperous as ever. -Macon Tel.

March 30, 1869
Federal Union
J. F. Burney, of Wilkinson county, has had a fifteen horse power Mill erected, capable of running a forty-six inch circular saw, a grist mill and a sixty saw gin. It saws 5,000 feet of lumber, or grinds 100 bushels of corn, or gins six bales of cotton per day. Cost $2,600. Mr. Dixon of the same county has also erected a similar mill.

 April 9, 1869
Southern Christian Advocate
Isaac Hall was born in Jackson co., Ga., Nov. 12th 1788, and died in Wilkinson co., March 5th, 1869, in his 71st year [sic]. W. S. Baker

May 28, 1869
Southern Christian Advocate
Mrs. L. A. Carlyle was born Nov. 4th 1849, married Mr. W. C. D. Carlyle Dec. 19th 1867, and died in Irwinton, Ga., March 20th 1869. She left two little daughters, only ten days old. In one month, one of them died and some ten days after the other was taken. W. S. Baker

 June 4, 1869
Southern Christian Advocate
Married. By the same, on 27th May, Mr. James F. Freeman of Wilkinson co., Ga., to Miss Mary F. Moye, of Johnson co., Ga.

June 25, 1869
Georgia Weekly Telegraph
The Pic-Nic at Gordon and Gordon Mills.
From the Central Georgia, 23d.)
  Through the kindness of Folsom, of that most excellent wayside Inn, the Gordon House, we spent a delightful day at Gordon on Wednesday last. One mile from the Depot is situated a lovely place for holding a pic-nic. Under a spreading pine, Col. Folsom has erected a platform sufficiently large to accommodate four sets of dancers, where those so inclined can participate in that most fascinating amusement. Throughout the grove are arranged seats for parties who prefer a quiet conversation; swings for the more juvenile portion of the assembly are also erected. Hard by is one of the finest mill-ponds we ever saw, where are to be found a number of boats, (one ready manned), for the use of excursionists
  Assembled at this delightful retreat on Wednesday morning were lovely daughters and gallant sons from Wilkinson, and adjoining counties, and also quiet an array of grace and beauty, with their gentlemanly escorts, from the city of Macon, all came out to participate in the festivities of the day. Miller's String Band, from Macon, was also present, discoursing the sweetest music. A most bountiful repast, embracing all that appetite could crave, was served up. It is unnecessary to say more that that it was a glorious time.
   The point is so admirably adapted to picnic excursion that we wonder attention has not been given it before. The trains from Savannah and Macon pass Gordon within a short time of each other, and just at a pleasant hour in the morning. The Hotel is admirably kept by a Landlord and lady who regard not their own comfort or convenience while serving their guests. All these combined give the Gordon Mills a peculiar attraction for the purpose above named.
  A word about the Gordon Mills. These Mills, as before remarked, are situated one mile from the Railroad Depot, and are capable (with only two sets of stones,) of grinding three hundred bushels of grain per day. The waterwheel is one of the best in the country, and, with the head of water ever at hand, capable of driving any reasonable amount of machinery. Col. Folsom contemplates adding a cotton and wool factory, as soon as circumstances will permit. Parties can ship grain to these mills by railroad and return, for one fare. Shipped one day, ground and returned the next.

September 21, 1869
The Atlanta Constitution
Richard Nelson, the alleged murderer of L. A. Goulding (sic Golden), in Gordon, has been arrested in Savannah. - Savannah News.

September 30, 1869
A PROCLAMATION
$1,000 REWARD
Georgia. by Rufus B. Bullock, Governor of Said State.
  Whereas, S J. Bush, Coroner of Wilkinson county, has reported to this Department, under date 23d September, instant, that a murder was committed in said county of Wilkinson on the 13th instant, upon the person of L. A. Golden, as is alleged by one R. N. Nelson, and that the said Nelson has fled from justice; and,
   Whereas the said Coroner further reports to me that the civil officers of said county of Wilkinson have used their utmost exertions in apprehending the murderer, but without success:
 Now, therefore, I have thought proper to issue this, my Proclamation, hereby offering a reward of One Thousand Dollars for the apprehension and delivery of the said R. N. Nelson, with evidence sufficient, to convict to the Sheriff of said county of Wilkinson.
  And I do moreover charge and required all officers in this State, civil and military, to be vigilant in endeavoring to apprehend the said R. N. Nelson in order that he may be brought to trail for the crime with which he stands charged.
  Given under my hand and the great seal of State, at the Capitol, in Atlanta, this 28th day of September, in the year of our Lord, Eighteen Hundred and sixty-nine, and  of the Independence of the United States the Ninety-Fourth.
  RUFUS B. BULLOCK,  Governor
By the Governor:
DAVID G. COTTING,   Secretary of State

DESCRIPTION.
The said Nelson is about 28 years of age, thin visaged, light complexion, has red goatee and mustache, weighs about 123 pounds, and has lost two fingers off his right hand.

October 8, 1869
Southern Christian Advocate
On Sept. 23d, 1869 in Wilkinson co., Ga., by Rev. C. W. Smith, Mr. W. H. Fitzpatrick to Miss Lizzie Massey.

October 15, 1869
Georgia Weekly Telegraph
ADMINSTRATRIX'S SALE- By virtue of an order from the Court of Ordinary of Twiggs county, will be sold on the first Tuesday in December next, at the Court House door in Irwinton, Wilkinson county, Georgia, during the legal hours of sale, 1200 acres of land, more or less, situated near Gordon; is known as the Graves place, and adjoins the lands of Judge Whitehurst, B. Bridgers, F. Newby, and others, and belongs to the estate of John Fitzpatrick, late of Twigs county, deceased. The land will be sold in small lots. Sold for distribution. Terms cash. Elizabeth G. Fitzpatrick, Administratrix.

October 15, 1869
Southern Christian Advocate
Also on 3d Oct., 1869 by the same, Mr. L. M. Harmon of Putnam co., to Mrs. E. F. Lisenby of Wilkinson co.

October 22, 1869
Georgia Weekly Telegraph
EXECUTOR'S SALE- Will be sold before the Court-House door, in the town of Irwinton, Wilkinson county, Ga., on the first Tuesday in November next the following described lot, vis: One hundred and a quarter (101¼) acres, being part of lot No. 88; one hundred and a quarter (101¼ being part of lot No. 83;  and forty (40) acres being part of lot No. 111- in the third district of said county and containing in all two hundred and forty-two and a half (242½) acres; adjoining land of Thos. W. Dupree, C. C. Stokes, and others. Sold for distribution among a portion of the heirs ofJoel Butler, deceased, late of said county. Terms cash. G. W. Butler, Executor. sept 19.

October 29, 1869
Southern Christian Advocate
Married
In Wilkinson co., Ga., at Jos. N. Meadors', Esq., on the 24th Oct., by Rev. C. B. Anderson, Rev. Jesse Peacock to MissMarietta R. Anderson, of Forsyth co., N. C..

November 16, 1869
Southern Recorder
MARRIED, In Wilkinson county, November 4th, 1869, by Rev. C. B. Anderson, Mr. THOMAS POTTER and Miss P. WOOD, both of Baldwin county.

November 24, 1869
The Atlanta Constitution
Richard Nelson, tried at Wilkinson Superior Court, for the murder of L. A. Golden, was found guilty. - Cor. Macon Telegraph

November 28, 1869
Columbus Ledger-Enquirer
The Milledgeville Federal Union says that McDaniel and Nelson , both of whom were found guilty of murder at the late term of Wilkinson Superior Court, are confined at present in jail in that city, McDaniel to be hung on the 10th December next, and Nelson  to be imprisoned in the Penitentiary for life.

December 7, 1869
Federal Union
Adminstrator's Sale. Will be sold on the first Tuesday in December next before the Court House door in Irwinton, Wilkinson county, all the lands belonging to the estate of William Ryle, deceased, late of said county, containing two hundred and sixty-three acres more or less, situated in Ramah District, adjoining lands of D. J. Ryle, William Kennington, David Hudson and others. Terms cash. D. J. RYLE, Adm'r. Oct 11, 1869.

~excerpts~Wilkinson Sheriff sale, ..sold..First Tuesday in December next...All that lot of land known as Lot No. 176 in the 3rd District of said county, containing 202 1-2 acres, more or less, levied on to satisfy a morgage fifa obtained..October Term, 1868, in favor of John P. Fort, Ex'r. vs. Joseph Meadows. L. L. Peacock, D. Sh'ff. Oct. 22d, 1869

~excerpts~Will be sold..1st Tuesday in January next..Lot of land No. 205, in the 5th District of said county, containing  202 1/2 acres, more or less. sold  as the property of Allen H. Eady, deceased. Edny H. Eady.... Nov.  5th, 1869

~excerpts~ first Tuesday in January next,...all of the lands belonging to the estate of Alfred  Branan, deceased, containing four hundred and fifty acres, more or  less, adjoining the lands of Carswell Branan, Dr. J. T. Hudson and Mrs. Winniford McCook. There  is a public mill road of long standing running through the premises; these lands are situate immediately in the forks of the Fairchild's Branch and Commissioners Creek; ...John T. Branan, Adm'r. Nov, 18, 1869

December 9, 1869
The Atlanta Constitution
Richard Nelson who was convicted of murder at the last term of the Wilkinson County, and sentenced to the Penitentiary for life, has been pardoned by the Governor. See Obit.

December 28, 1869
Georgia Weekly Telegraph
Desirable Plantation for Sale! I offer for sale my Plantation near the pleasant town of Irwinton, Wilkinson county, containing about 1,150 acres, half cleared and partly in cultivation this year. It is situated thirty miles below Macon on the Central Railroad, five miles from No. 16 and six miles from No. 15 stations. Society, churches, health and the school in Irwinton, one and a half miles off, cannot be surpassed, together with abundance of steady and reliable labor, productive land, well watered, with good improvements, make it a desirable Plantation. Terms easy. Persons wishing to purchase are invited to look, and will be met at either station. I will sell a bargain. Apply to G. H. Breazeal, Irwinton, Ga.


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